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Tapered steel masts of wind turbines washed by drifting cloud on mountaintop. Sunlight gleams on gently rotating blades. Dark silhouette of hills in distant background, with clear blue sky above. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Coniferous forest and moorland hillside wreathed in fog. Trees in shades of green with drifting white mist. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Blades of three wind turbines barely rotate in still air. Foggy, gloomy autumn day with low cloud on distant hills. Common rushes (Juncus effusus) unfocussed in foreground. Pan L-R shot in ProRes 422.

Juvenile Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus Ridibundus) perched on handrail by riverside walkway in Londonderry. Ringed seabird with ring on each leg flies away. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Low cloud swirls around steel grey wind turbine as rotating blades slice the air. Detailed view of powerful wind turbine against cloudy grey sky. Tilt up shot in ProRes 422.

Hillside wind turbine at dusk with common rushes (Juncus effusus) in foreground. Orange sunset sky, red warning beacon and dark grey clouds. Zoom out fast motion shot in ProRes 422.

Bright red warning beacons flash atop hillside wind turbines, casting red light on slowly rotating blades. Streetlamps and house lights twinkle in dark valley below. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Bright moon rises from behind cloud to reveal rotating wind turbine on dark evening. Zoom in fast motion shot in ProRes 422.

Warning beacons cast red light across blades of wind turbines at dusk. Sharp wind sweeps clouds across grey evening sky with dark rotating blades in foreground. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Woodland vegetation overhangs slow-flowing brook. Colourful autumn leaves gently spiral down. Slow motion tilt up to lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Ruined stone castle on summer evening as sun begins to sink. Meadow grass and flowers sway gently in foreground, with ancient castle behind. Track L-R to lockdown slow motion shot in ProRes 422.

Red rosehips hang from thorny green stem of wild rose bush (Rosa canina). Yellowing autumn leaves in foreground. Lockdown rack focus shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Trio of rich red rose hips bunched together on green stem of wild rose bush (Rosa canina). Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Deep red berries contrast with yellow, decaying leaves of dogberry (Viburnum opulus) shrub. Lockdown rack focus shot in ProRes 422.

Flies and midges flit around decaying leaves in fall. Yellow, curling willow (salix) leaves herald autumn weather. Low autumn suns glints on delicate strands of spider web. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Misty day on tree-lined country lane. Trees dressed in colours of fall, with crisp leaves scattered on grassy verge of tarmac road. Tilt down shot to lockdown in flat profile ProRes 422.

Smooth grey bark of ash tree (Fraxinus excelsior) with fading green leaves at onset of autumn. Insects crawl on underside of serrated ash leaves. Tilt up shot with rack focus to lockdown in flat profile ProRes 422.

Vegetation with mosquito backlit at dusk. Green plant fibres visible in low angle sunlight. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Insect crawls purposefully up tall grass stalk at sundown. Detail of grass seed heads gleaming in evening sunlight. Tilt up shot in flat profile ProRes 422 with lens flare.

Thin grass stems with heavy seed heads wave gently in summer light. Midges dart about and cranefly with translucent wings lifts into the warm air. Sunlight gleams above tall trees. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Tall green nettles (Urtica dioica) sway in gentle summer breeze. Translucent hairs catch the light. Lockdown shot with lens flare in ProRes 422.

Tall, thin nettle stems (Urtica dioica) with hanging flower pendants. Translucent hairs glow in sunlight. Tilt up to lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Stinging nettles (Urtica dioica) sway gently in flickering light. Tiny fly alights on top of plant. Pan L-R to lockdown shot with lens flare in ProRes 422.

Midges, flies and insects rise from lush green meadow at sunset. Bucolic scene of pasture and woodland in shades of green, caught in golden glow. Sunlight gleams on wire strands of boundary fence. Tilt up to lockdown shot with lens flare in ProRes 422.

Little bird with long tail perches on lichen-covered stone wall. Black and white Pied Wagtail (Motacilla alba) stands against clear blue sky looking around and cheeping cheerily. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Tall slender grass stems and heavy seedheads quiver gently in a light breeze. Warm evening sunshine lends golden glow to tiny insects. Tilt down to lockdown shot with lens flare in ProRes 422.

Ancient castle in ruins surrounded by fresh green meadow grass. Bright sunlit stone beneath cloudless blue sky. Tilt up to lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Ruined stone castle bathed in warm sunlight, with cloudless blue sky. Tall, green summer grass gently waves in foreground, with centuries-old castle in background. Lockdown slow motion shot in ProRes 422.

Golden summer sun warms lush green meadow grass. Slender stems and heavy seedheads sway gently. Sunlight glints on wings of tiny insects dancing in the light. Tilt up shot with lens flare in ProRes 422.

Ruined stone castle stands tall against cloudless blue sky. Meadow grass sways gently in foreground, with ancient castle behind. Tilt up to lockdown slow motion shot in ProRes 422.

Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.

Early morning mist over lush wetland meadow. Light white mist hangs over rich green grassland. Trees and tall grass reflected in water. Tilt up to lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Bright fountain jets reach high into black night, reflected in shimmering lake. Falling droplets ripple water surface. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Sunset over wooded island set in shimmering lake. Boat weaves it’s way across the lough. View across rushy meadow to expanse of water. Fast motion zoom in shot with lens flare.

Tractor spreading slurry on spring evening. Shower of manure spreads over grassy field. Tractor tyres and spray of slurry lit by low sunlight. Lockdown shot.

Spring evening and farmer sprays slurry on pasture. Blue pipe carries liquid manure across field from slurry store to tractor. Lockdown shot.

Spring evening and farmer spreads liquid manure on pasture. Pipe from slurry store snakes across field to tractor. Lockdown slow motion shot.

Distant tractor stirs up dust on shimmering summer day. Heat haze over bare brown bogland with straight banks of milled peat awaiting collection. Green trees and scrub in background. Lockdown shot.

Turf (peat) cut and dried by hand has been a traditional fuel source throughout the island for thousands of years. In 1946 commercial peat extraction was granted to Bord na Móna in the Republic of Ireland, under the terms of the Turf Development Act.

Single pure, clear drop of water falls from edge of rusted corrugated iron roof. Droplet catches sunlight as it stretches to breaking point. Slow motion lockdown shot.

Shimmering heat haze over bare brown bogland. Long straight banks of milled peat awaiting collection. Green trees and scrub in background. Tilt-up to lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Turf (peat) cut and dried by hand has been a traditional fuel source throughout the island for thousands of years. In 1946 commercial peat extraction was granted to Bord na Móna in the Republic of Ireland, under the terms of the Turf Development Act.

Salty spray blows across thin grassland fields on bleak coastal clifftop. Fence wire vibrates in the gale. Ocean waves crash on jagged rocks below. Slow pan R-L shot.

Seagull driven backwards by ferocious wind. White-capped waves shatter into spray and mist on craggy coast. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Jumble of offshore sea stacks and stumps lashed by winter gale. Salty mist swirls through the air. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Taste the salt as powerful storm waves roll on to craggy rocks and burst into swirling spray and mist. Zoom in shot in ProRes 422.

Sea spume smeared over smooth stones. Sea foam in soft peaks like rich whipped cream quivers in the wind. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Storm raging offshore pushes crashing white waves far inside quiet rocky haven. Slow-motion lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

Powerful ocean wave split by solid rock stump. Creamy white foaming waves surge around jagged coastal rocks. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Raging ocean waves roll on to jagged coastline. Black rocks engulfed by powerful waves and air filled with swirling mist. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Green seawater atomised into fine white mist as huge ocean swell shatters on offshore rocks. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Stone tower on heather-clad clifftop with Atlantic waves crashing below. White-capped waves thrown onto jagged black rocks in storm. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal was home to Saint Colm Cille (Saint Columba) in the 6th Century.
Gale force winds lash jagged Donegal cliffs with sea spray and squally rain at daybreak. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal.
Heavy Atlantic seas explode into mist on jagged rocks. Seagulls soar and tumble through the air. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal.
Fierce Atlantic storm batters rocky Donegal upland coast. Sea spray fills the air as white foaming waves crash onto jagged rocks. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal.
Flail mower on hydraulic boom arm chews thorn hedge. Red tractor advances in bright sunlight. Slow motion lockdown shot with audio in ProRes 422.In the early 1930s inventor and pioneer aviator Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.
Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) swooping above Belfast city street. Aerobatic display by starlings against pink glow of clear evening sky. Tracking left shot in ProRes 422.European starling populations have fallen dramatically in recent decades, possibly due to food shortages and a loss of habitat.
Red brake lights glow brightly as cars approach crossing traffic at junction in Belfast. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.Traffic management systems in Belfast City centre include the introduction of bus lanes and cycle lanes.
Buses and cars slow down at red traffic lights in Belfast City centre. Glistening black tarmac road edged with painted lines and kerbstones. Lockdown shot.Traffic management systems in Belfast City centre include the introduction of bus lanes and cycle lanes.
Streetlamp warms up to yellow glow as starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) swoop against a clear blue sky in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Combination fast motion and real time zoom in shot in ProRes 422.European starling populations have fallen dramatically in recent decades, possibly due to food shortages and a loss of habitat.
Noisy mower on long boom arm trims rough grass on roadside verge. Tractor advances slowly on large black tyres with chevron tread. Pan left to lockdown shot with audio in flat profile ProRes 422.In the early 1930s inventor Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.
Noisy mower shreds long grass on roadside verge. Tractor advances slowly on large black tyres with chevron tread. Slow-motion lockdown shot with audio.In the early 1930s Ulster inventor Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.
Foaming seawater splashes over smooth round pebbles on Antrim shoreline. Black stones and strips of brown seaweed submerged beneath creamy white sea foam. Slow motion handheld shot in ProRes 422.A popular tourist destination, the North Antrim Coast has such notable natural features as The Giant's Causeway, Rathlin Island and Fair Head.
Noisy hedge trimmer edges towards ripe red berries in autumn hedgerow. Powerful tractor-mounted mower on hydraulic arm. Tilt-up shot with audio.In the early 1930s Ulster inventor Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.
Noisy mower shreds long grass on roadside verge. Tractor advances slowly on large black tyres with chevron tread. Lockdown shot with audio.In the early 1930s inventor and pioneer aviator Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.
Powerful tractor-mounted mower on hydraulic arm lowered into position. Autumn grass and leaves scattered by noisy verge trimmer. Lockdown shot with audio.In the early 1930s Ulster inventor Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.
Grey-green waves swirl and splash around black dolerite rocks on the North Antrim Coast. Foaming water cascades back down into the Atlantic Ocean. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.A popular tourist destination, the North Antrim Coast has such notable natural features as The Giant's Causeway, Rathlin Island and Fair Head.
Narrow sea channel with choppy water leads to shoreline of smooth, round pebbles flecked with seaweed pieces. Dunseverick on the North Antrim Coast. Handheld tilt-down rack focus shot.A popular tourist destination, the North Antrim Coast has such notable natural features as The Giant's Causeway, Rathlin Island and Fair Head.
Ocean waves splash closer and closer through narrow cleft in eroded dolerite sill. Squally weather on rocky North Antrim shoreline with foaming Atlantic seas. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the such notable natural features as The Giant's Causeway, Whitepark Bay and Rathlin Island.

Restless grey sea in sheltered channel. Narrow cove with black rocks and view to ocean horizon. Handheld tilt-up slow-motion shot in ProRes 422.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the such notable natural features as The Giant’s Causeway, Whitepark Bay and Rathlin Island.

Cold Atlantic ocean with waves all around. Swamped by frothing, choppy seawater. Lockdown shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the such notable natural features as The Giant’s Causeway, Whitepark Bay and Rathlin Island.

Tattered brown-red kelp dangles from black rocks on the Antrim coast. Storm-cast seaweed thrown onto rocky shore and battered by white foaming waves. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

The North Antrim coast is an upland coastline of complex geology, exposed to the full force of Atlantic storms. It is a popular tourist destination throughout the year, whatever the weather.

Wave after wave of cold, grey water rolls into the shore. Spindrift is blown from tops of white-crested waves. Single seabird flies through frame. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

The north coast of Antrim is an upland coast of complex geology, exposed to the full force of the Atlantic ocean.

White-crested waves churn among black rocks of upland coast. Spindrift spray fills the air. Seabirds fly through frame, scooting above sea surface. Lockdown shot in ProRes 422.

The Antrim Coast is an upland coast of complex geology, exposed to the full force of the Atlantic ocean.

Grey-green waves crash around craggy black rock. Shreds of seaweed float in foaming surf. Tilt-up to lockdown slow-motion shot.

The north coast of Antrim is an upland coast of complex geology, exposed to the full force of the Atlantic ocean.

Sea-smooth pebbles glisten as foaming waves rush ashore in County Antrim. Shreds of wet seaweed are washed around. Lockdown slow-motion shot with shallow DOF.

The north coast of Antrim is an upland coast of complex geology, exposed to the full force of the Atlantic ocean.

Bright, white waves crash through black rocks on the North Antrim coast. Closeup as winter seas surge through narrow rocky channel. Lockdown slow-motion shot with shallow DOF.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the such notable natural features as The Giant’s Causeway, Whitepark Bay and Rathlin Island.

A murmuration of starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) soaring and swooping against a clear blue sky over Belfast, Northern Ireland. Starling aerobatic display before dusk. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.European starling populations have fallen dramatically in recent decades, possibly due to food shortages and a loss of habitat.

Traffic control signals colour sequence from red to amber to green. Traffic lights glow brightly on misty evening in Belfast. Lockdown shot.

Belfast city centre features a complex mix of dedicated bus lanes and cycle routes with an increasing number of pedestrianised areas.

A murmuration of starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) swooping and soaring above Belfast city street. Aerobatic display by flock of starlings against pale blue evening sky over Belfast, Northern Ireland. Lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

European starling populations have fallen dramatically in recent decades, possibly due to food shortages and a loss of habitat.

Lone cyclist with flashing red safety light crosses Lagan Weir Pedestrian and Cycle Bridge in Belfast at night. Misty urban landscape with passing traffic washed by light. Rack focus lockdown shot in flat profile ProRes 422.

Lagan Weir Pedestrian and Cycle Bridge was opened in 2015 to improve access to the Queen’s Quay and Titanic Quarter areas of Belfast. It replaced an narrow footbridge built in 1994.

Passing car headlights glint through railings and flash bright patterns on parapet of Belfast’s Queen’s Bridge. Bright car lights gleam on the iron latticework. Lockdown shot.

Queen’s Bridge is one of eight bridges in the city of Belfast. Spanning the River Lagan, it was opened in 1849 by Queen Victoria.

Powerful tractor-mounted mower on hydraulic arm trims branches, leaves and berries of autumn hedgerow. Shallow depth of field with defocus. Lockdown shot with audio.

Hedgerow trimming is best completed outside of the nesting season.

County Kildare raised bog with drainage ditches, fringed by colonising tree growth. Brown peatland drying out before commercial harvesting for compost and fuel. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

Turf (peat) cut and dried by hand has been a traditional fuel source throughout the island for thousands of years. In 1946 commercial peat extraction was granted to Bord na Móna in the Republic of Ireland, under the terms of the Turf Development Act.

Little swallow perches outside mud nest, preparing to make first flight. Tiny bugs crawl on white feathers and bird gapes with bright yellow mouth. Lockdown shot.

Each spring swallows migrate from Africa, flying thousands of miles to Western Europe to breed. They return to reuse their old nests, year after year.

Royal Canal in County Longford. Old waterway, lined with reeds, flows beneath arch of stone bridge. Technological change where wooden telegraph poles follow course of 19th-century communications route. Tilt-down shot.

The Royal Canal, running from Dublin to Longford, was built between 1790 and 1817 for the transportation of freight and passengers. With the advent of the railways it soon fell into disuse and disrepair. Recent years have seen the restoration of the Royal Canal as a tourist route.

Stone-built bridges from the early 1800s cross the Royal Canal in rural County Longford. Lush green vegetation and glistening water are bathed in sunshine. Lockdown shot.

The Royal Canal, running from Dublin to Longford, was built between 1790 and 1817 for the transportation of freight and passengers. With the advent of the railways it soon fell into disuse and disrepair. Recent years have seen the restoration of the Royal Canal as a tourist route.

Young swallows gape with bright yellow mouths as parent arrives to feed them. Sibling swallows huddled together in mud nest. Lockdown shot.

Each spring swallows migrate from Africa, flying thousands of miles to Western Europe to breed. They return to reuse their old nests, year after year.

Sibling swallows sitting side-by-side in mud nest before one flies away. Little birds with yellow gaping mouths and blue feathers. Lockdown shot.

Each spring swallows migrate from Africa, flying thousands of miles to Western Europe to breed. They return to reuse their old nests, year after year.

Wild Irish hare carefully grooming it’s forelegs. Hare sits in paddock of grass, buttercups, clover and daisies. Lockdown shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Wild Irish hare sits quietly in paddock alert to danger. Washes face and paws then hops out of frame. Lockdown shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Alert Irish Hare sits at edge of forest, twitching it’s ears and sniffing the air, then hops away. Lockdown slow motion shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Irish Hare hops across mown meadow. Brown-coloured adult hare with long hind legs, black ears and white tail. Slow motion follow shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Irish Hare with long, dark ears skips along a grassy path between trees and meadow grasses. Lockdown slow motion shot with speed ramp.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Gothic arches of Moyne Abbey cloister in sunlight, viewed between stone piers. Remnants of painted plaster on carved stone surface. Contrasting brightness and shadow. Tilt-up shot.

Moyne Abbey with cruciform church, chapel, belltower and cloisters was founded as a Franciscan friary at Killala around 1462. Dissolved by Henry VIII, the abbey was burned by Sir Richard Bingham in 1590, though it is thought that friars continued to reside there until the end of the 18th century.

White flowers on hawthorn tree branch, bouncing in the breeze. Tiny nectar droplets glisten. Shallow depth-of-field with mosaic of leaves and blossom blurred in background. Tilt-up to lockdown shot in 4K.

Hawthorn Crataegus monogyna is a small deciduous tree which is native to Ireland. It’s deep red fruits, which ripen in autumn, are known as a ‘haws’.

Extruded turf fuel drying on the surface of a Kildare bog in neat lines. Dark brown peat sods contrast with fresh green ferns and grass. Pan R-L to lockdown shot in 4K.

Turf (peat) cut and dried by hand has been a traditional fuel source throughout the island for thousands of years. In 1946 commercial peat extraction was granted to Bord na Móna in the Republic of Ireland, under the terms of the Turf Development Act.

Neat lines of extruded peat sods drying on the surface of a bog in Co. Kildare. Dark brown turf contrasts with fresh green grass and ferns. Tilt-up to lockdown shot in 4K.

Turf (peat) cut and dried by hand has been a traditional fuel source throughout the island for thousands of years. In 1946 commercial peat extraction was granted to Bord na Móna in the Republic of Ireland, under the terms of the Turf Development Act.

Quad bike driven quickly across Bog of Allen throws up dust cloud. Bright orange hi-vis vest contrasts strongly with dark brown peatland. Strong heat haze as brown turf dust billows across scene. Slow tilt-down shot in 4K.

Turf (peat) cut and dried by hand has been a traditional fuel source throughout the island for thousands of years. In 1946 commercial peat extraction was granted to Bord na Móna in the Republic of Ireland, under the terms of the Turf Development Act.

Bord Na Móna railway line stretches into unstable peatland in County Kildare. Dust cloud drifts across warm, dry landscape with heat haze. Lockdown shot in 4K.

Turf (peat) cut and dried by hand has been a traditional fuel source throughout the island for thousands of years. In 1946 commercial peat extraction was granted to Bord na Móna in the Republic of Ireland, under the terms of the Turf Development Act.

Thorn tree branches festooned with creamy white blossom, gently stirred by the wind. Shallow depth-of-field with green leaves in background. Lockdown shot in 4K.

Hawthorn Crataegus monogyna is a small deciduous tree which is native to Ireland. It’s deep red fruits, which ripen in autumn, are known as a ‘haws’.

White blossom and bright green leaves on hawthorn tree flutter in the breeze. Lockdown shot in 4K.

Hawthorn Crataegus monogyna is a small deciduous tree which is native to Ireland. It’s deep red fruits, which ripen in autumn, are known as a ‘haws’.

Dark green waves roll onto Keel beach at dusk. Steep jagged cliffs form backdop. Lockdown slow motion shot.

Achill Island is located on the Atlantic coast of Ireland, in Co. Mayo. It is an area of dramatic sea cliffs and craggy mountains, white beaches and quiet coves. Keel is a popular tourist destination and holiday location.

Little barrel waves roll onto the beach at Keel. Rich blue-green waves break into white surf. Lone island with faint pink sky at dusk. Pan R-L to lockdown slow motion shot.

Achill Island is located on the Atlantic coast of Ireland, in Co. Mayo. It is an area of dramatic sea cliffs and craggy mountains, white beaches and quiet coves. Achill Island is a popular tourist destination and holiday location.

Hills aligned in parallel sit above shallow Bellacragher Bay near Achill Island in County Mayo. Brown peat fringes bleached moorland at water’s edge. Tilt-down shot.

County Mayo (from the Irish Mhaigh Eo meaning ‘Plain of the yew trees’) is located in the province of Connacht, in the west of Ireland and is bounded to the west by the Atlantic Ocean. Northern Mayo is covered with large areas of blanket bog, while the south of the county is largely a limestone landscape.

Rhythmic waves lap gently on gravel shore of Lough Erne. Lockdown slow motion shot.

Lough Erne in County Fermanagh is comprised of an upper and lower lough, dotted with several hundred islands. It is a popular boating and angling destination, attracting visitors from across the world.

Clusters of creamy-white flowers on thorn tree in thin Fermanagh evening light. Sharp black thorns and fresh green leaves on branches. Track L-R shot.

Blackthorn Prunus spinosa is a small deciduous tree which is native to Ireland. It’s dark blue-black fruits, which ripen in autumn, are known as a ‘sloes’.

At Moyne Friary only ornate stonework of medieval stained-glass window remains. Elaborate tracery with cross motif set into thick stone wall of ancient church. Tilt-up shot.

Moyne Abbey with cruciform church, chapel, belltower and cloisters was founded as a Franciscan friary at Killala around 1462. Dissolved by Henry VIII, the abbey was burned by Sir Richard Bingham in 1590, though it is thought that friars continued to reside there until the end of the 18th century.

Light streams in through windows of old stonebuilt vaulted store in Moyne Friary, County Mayo. Thick medieval stone walls with deep window embrasures. Tilt-up shot.

Moyne Abbey with cruciform church, chapel, belltower and cloisters was founded as a Franciscan friary at Killala around 1462. Dissolved by Henry VIII, the abbey was burned by Sir Richard Bingham in 1590, though it is thought that friars continued to reside there until the end of the 18th century.

Medieval stone collonade in Moyne Abbey, with shadow cast on wall behind. Carved stone gothic arches and columns of ancient friary cloister showing remnants of plaster surface. Tilt-down shot.

Moyne Abbey with cruciform church, chapel, belltower and cloisters was founded as a Franciscan friary at Killala around 1462. Dissolved by Henry VIII, the abbey was burned by Sir Richard Bingham in 1590, though it is thought that friars continued to reside there until the end of the 18th century.

Wall of white surf engulfs rocky shore of Causeway Coast. Whiteout as foaming waves crash onto basalt rocks in huge storm. Sea spray glows in low evening sunlight. Lockdown slow motion shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the such notable natural features as The Giant’s Causeway, Whitepark Bay and Rathlin Island.

Violent surf crashes onto dark basalt cliff of the Causeway Coast. High white waves catch low sunlight and the air is filled with salty mist and spray. Pan L-R shot.

Looking east along the Antrim coastline. On a clear day the Scottish Isles are visible across the sea, some 20 miles away.

Irish medieval decorative stonework in silhouette. Tripartite gothic window set in thick stone wall, reaching to apex of roofless Moyne Abbey. Tilt-up shot with lens flare.

Moyne Abbey with cruciform church, chapel, belltower and cloisters was founded as a Franciscan friary at Killala around 1462. Dissolved by Henry VIII, the abbey was burned by Sir Richard Bingham in 1590, though it is thought that friars continued to reside there until the end of the 18th century.

Old railway cutting with stone bridge now overgrown by vegetation. Tangle of moss-covered trees block derelict rail line. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

The Enniskillen and Bundoran Railway line operated from 1868 until it was closed in September 1957.

Grass grows on gently rolling Fermanagh hillside. Farm field is fringed by tall hedgerow in various shades of green. Tall trees cast long shadows on the grass. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

County Fermanagh is reknowned for it’s rich pastureland on the shores of Lough Erne.

Green leaves of ash tree flutter in the breeze. Fresh new stems burst from black buds each spring. Rack focus lockdown shot.

Ash trees (Fraxinus excelsior) are a common hedgerow tree in County Fermanagh. Ash dieback disease could have a potentially devastating impact on the Fermanagh landscape.

Low doorway with carved gothic arch leads in to narrow passage at Moyne Abbey. Triple arched shadow of church window cast on to thick stone wall. Tilt-up shot.

Moyne Abbey with cruciform church, chapel, belltower and cloisters was founded as a Franciscan friary at Killala around 1462. Dissolved by Henry VIII, the abbey was burned by Sir Richard Bingham in 1590, though it is thought that friars continued to reside there until the end of the 18th century.

Doorway arch catches warm amber sunlight at Moyne Abbey. Focus switches from grey stone pillar to reveal curved archway in background. Rack focus shot.

Moyne Abbey with cruciform church, chapel, belltower and cloisters was founded as a Franciscan friary at Killala around 1462. Dissolved by Henry VIII, the abbey was burned by Sir Richard Bingham in 1590, though it is thought that friars continued to reside there until the end of the 18th century.

Stream flows through narrow gorge formed in limestone. Water splashes and bubbles spread out downstream. Deep river channel formed by constant erosion of grey rock. Tilt-down to lockdown slow motion shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh.

Rough grazing land fringes heather moor reaching to Cuilcagh Mountain in distance. Mountain slopes dusted with snow in early springtime; leafless hawthorn tree and large limestone block in foreground. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

Cuilcagh (from Irish Binn Chuilceach) Mountain Park is part of the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, created in 2001. Some of the blanket bog on Cuilcagh Mountain is designated under the Ramsar Convention.

Heather moorland with dried grasses on edge of Deel River valley, with peak of Birreencorragh (from the Irish Birín Corrach, meaning ‘rocky little spike’) mountain in distance, wrapped in fog. Bird flies low over the heath, hugging the terrain. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

County Mayo (Mhaigh Eo – ‘Plain of the yew trees’) is located in the province of Connacht, in the west of Ireland and is bounded to the west by the Atlantic Ocean. Northern Mayo is covered with large areas of blanket bog, while the south of the county is largely a limestone landscape.

Spikes of field rushes with brown seed heads in foreground. Mixed oak and ash forest trees in background. Pan L-R with rack focus shot.

Fermanagh (from Irish Fir Manach or Fear Manach, meaning ‘Men of Manach’) is distinctive for being bisected by two lakes—Upper and Lower Lough Erne—which run the entire length of the county.

Solid stone embrasure with romanesque arch at Moyne Abbey. Rich grassland glimpsed through lichen-covered carved stone slit window. Tilt-up shot with lens flare.

Moyne Abbey with cruciform church, chapel, belltower and cloisters was founded as a Franciscan friary at Killala around 1462. Dissolved by Henry VIII, the abbey was burned by Sir Richard Bingham in 1590, though it is thought that friars continued to reside there until the end of the 18th century.

Tall tower at Moyne Abbey glimpsed through three arches of church window. Remnants of medieval friary viewed through stone gothic window frame. Tilt-up shot.

Moyne Abbey was founded as a Franciscan friary and is located on the shores of Killala Bay, near Ballina in County Mayo, in the province of Connacht. Consecrated in 1462, it was destroyed in 1590.

Minaun Cliffs with pink glow in setting sun. Atlantic waves roll gently ashore shore at Keel. Slow motion lockdown shot.

Achill Island is located on the Atlantic coast of Ireland, in Co. Mayo. It is an area of dramatic sea cliffs and craggy mountains, white beaches and quiet coves. Achill Island is a popular holiday destination.

View across blanket bog of Cuilcagh Mountain Park from Lough Atona. Green forest and farmland pasture in Lough Macnean valley. Pan R-L shot.

Cuilcagh (from Irish Binn Chuilceach) Mountain Park is part of the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, created in 2001. Some of the blanket bog on Cuilcagh Mountain is designated as a Special Area of Conservation.

Tiny midges fly around dried, dead heather flowers at start of spring, in Cuilcagh Mountain Park. Tilt-up shot.

Heather (Calluna vulgaris) is a low-growing plant. It is tolerant of grazing by deer, sheep and grouse, and regenerates following occasional burning.

Dried, dead heather flowers and grass stalks of blanket bog at close of winter. Cuilcagh Mountain Park with view across bleached heather heath to lowland beyond. Rack focus lockdown shot.

Cuilcagh (from Irish Binn Chuilceach) Mountain Park is part of the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, created in 2001. Some of the blanket bog on Cuilcagh Mountain is designated under the Ramsar Convention.

Look across Lough Atona, blanket bog, and woodland from Cuilcagh Mountain. Natural upland landscape with cultivated farmland around Upper Lough Macnean in distance. Tilt-up shot.

Cuilcagh (from Irish Binn Chuilceach) Mountain Park is part of the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, created in 2001. Some of the blanket bog on Cuilcagh Mountain is designated under the Ramsar Convention.

Cow grazing in lush green meadow, wrapping it’s tongue around the grass and munching as it slowly steps forward. Tracking slow motion shot.

Grassland for dairy, beef and sheep farming dominates the rural landscape in Ireland. Cropping of silage, some hay and occasionally barley is common in the summer months.

Evening sunlight casts shadows on ancient walls of Moyne monastery. Low doorway with gothic arch. Tilt-up shot.

Moyne Abbey was founded as a Franciscan friary and is located on the shores of Killala Bay, near Ballina in County Mayo, in the province of Connacht. Consecrated in 1462, it was destroyed in 1590.

Roofless and abandoned monastery at Moyne in Co. Mayo. Grey gravestones now occupy nave and chancel of ancient church. Evening light streams through ornate stonework of west window. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

Moyne Abbey was founded as a Franciscan friary and is located on the shores of Killala Bay, near Ballina in County Mayo, in the province of Connacht. Consecrated in 1462, it was destroyed in 1590.

Black jackdaw perched high on church tower senses danger and flies off into clear blue sky. Slow motion, low angle lockdown shot.

In autumn and winter jackdaws often join with rooks to roost together in large numbers. They may be distinguished from rooks by their smaller size and distinctive pale eyes.

Rainwater weeps from base of carved stone column in shade of ancient cloister walk. Medieval craftsmanship now crumbling and coated with green algae. Rack focus to lockdown shot.

Moyne Abbey was founded as a Franciscan friary and is located on the shores of Killala Bay, near Ballina in County Mayo, in the province of Connacht. Consecrated in 1462, it was destroyed in 1590.

Ancient abbey cloister at Moyne, with line of carved stone columns. Stonemason’s craftsmanship ravaged by time as algae grows on rain soaked columns. Tilt-down to lockdown shot.

Moyne Abbey was founded as a Franciscan friary and is located on the shores of Killala Bay, near Ballina in County Mayo, in the province of Connacht. Consecrated in 1462, it was destroyed in 1590.

Early morning with hills of Achill Island in the distance standing dark against pale blue sky. High tide washes brown turf from edge of bleached moor into Bellacragher Bay. Tilt-down to lockdown shot.

County Mayo (from the Irish Mhaigh Eo meaning ‘Plain of the yew trees’) is located in the province of Connacht, in the west of Ireland and is bounded to the west by the Atlantic Ocean. Northern Mayo is covered with large areas of blanket bog, while the south of the county is largely a limestone landscape.

Rocky mountain edge falls into blue sea at Keem, in early morning light. Atlantic Ocean laps gently on steep jagged shore of Achill Island. Handheld shot.

Achill Island is located on the Atlantic coast of Ireland, in Co. Mayo. It is an area of dramatic sea cliffs and craggy mountains, white beaches and quiet coves. Achill Island is a popular tourist destination and holiday location.

Heather-covered hill in early light, reflected in the sea at Bellacragher Bay. Linear settlement follows the shoreline. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

County Mayo (from the Irish Mhaigh Eo meaning ‘Plain of the yew trees’) is located in the province of Connacht, in the west of Ireland and is bounded to the west by the Atlantic Ocean. Northern Mayo is covered with large areas of blanket bog, while the south of the county is largely a limestone landscape.

Ruined stone cottage with mist at daybreak; hills in background. Long-abandoned stone-built farmhouse surrounded by brambles and rushes on wet, boggy hillside in thin early light. Tilt-up shot.

County Mayo (from the Irish Mhaigh Eo meaning ‘Plain of the yew trees’) is located in the province of Connacht, in the west of Ireland and is bounded to the west by the Atlantic Ocean. Northern Mayo is covered with large areas of blanket bog, while the south of the county is largely a limestone landscape.

Ruined cottage overlooks mist-filled valley in early morning. Tumbledown stone cottage sits in lee of hill on wet, rushy marginal farmland. Pan L-R shot.

County Mayo (from the Irish Mhaigh Eo meaning ‘Plain of the yew trees’) is located in the province of Connacht, in the west of Ireland and is bounded to the west by the Atlantic Ocean. Northern Mayo is covered with large areas of blanket bog, while the south of the county is largely a limestone landscape.

Northern Mayo landscape of undulating hills and moorland. Sunlight glistens in glass insulators of utility pole. Wires criss-cross against a clear blue morning sky. Pan R-L shot.

County Mayo (from the Irish Mhaigh Eo meaning ‘Plain of the yew trees’) is located in the province of Connacht, in the west of Ireland and is bounded to the west by the Atlantic Ocean. Northern Mayo is covered with large areas of blanket bog, while the south of the county is largely a limestone landscape.

Breeze gently stirs the surface of Lough Talt in Co. Mayo. Basin of clear blue water is encircled by hills and fringed with thorn bushes and yellow gorse. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

Located in the foothills of the Ox Mountains in County Mayo, Lough Talt is a popular fishing lake of about 200 acres in size.

Setting sun casts pink glow on sea cliffs as series of Atlantic ocean waves build, then break onto the shore of Achill Island in County Mayo, Ireland. Lockdown shot.

Achill Island is located on the Atlantic coast of Ireland, in Co. Mayo. It is an area of dramatic sea cliffs and craggy mountains, white beaches and quiet coves. Achill Island is a popular tourist destination and holiday location.

Atlantic waves gently roll in to Achill Island at dusk, with steep sea cliffs bathed in pink glow of setting sun. Slow motion lockdown shot.

Achill Island is located on the Atlantic coast of Ireland, in Co. Mayo. It is an area of dramatic sea cliffs and craggy mountains, white beaches and quiet coves. Achill Island is a popular tourist destination and holiday location.

Wind-twisted hawthorn bush grows in limestone pavement. Large erratic rock on moss-covered limestone pavement. Classic scenery of reef knolls, bare rock, thin soil and scrub. Pan R-L shot with lens flare.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh.

Bare limestone rockface with patches of moss in early spring. Lichen-covered ash trees growing in thin soil reach to clear blue sky. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh.

Silver birch trees cast long shadows on spring morning. Three moss-covered birch trees stand with bare branches against a blue sky. Tilt-down to lockdown shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh.

Hawthorn tree with bare branches with cold sky at sunset. Thorn tree grows on thin soil of rocky limestone hillside. Tilt-up shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh.

Upland stream disappears into swallowhole in limestone area. Typical geological feature of karst landscape. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh.

Water bubbles over rocks and pebbles, then bubbles through small cascade. Mossy twigs and branches unfocussed in foreground. Handheld slow motion shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh.

Peatland runoff water splashes over rocks in narrow limestone gorge. Small rivulet bubbles through deep channel formed by weathering and constant erosion of lichen-covered rock. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh.

Thick birch and ash woodland fills deep limestone gorge. Exposed rocky outcrop with post and wire fence. Bleached bare branches in early spring underneath a blue sky. Tilt-up to lockdown shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh.

Swallows chase through the air, catching insects on a warm summer evening. Birds in silhouette against a pastel blue sky. Lockdown shot.

Each spring swallows migrate from Africa, flying thousands of miles to Western Europe to breed. They return to reuse their old nests, year after year.

Swallows catch insects rising from mown meadow grass at dusk. Hundreds of swallow dive and swoop above hedgerows and rich grassland. Lockdown shot.

Each spring swallows migrate from Africa, flying thousands of miles to Western Europe to breed. They return to reuse their old nests, year after year.

Mellow evening hues as swallows dance in hazy air above luxuriant woodland vista. Ash trees and hawthorn hedge in full leaf, frame the scene. Lockdown shot.

Each spring swallows migrate from Africa, flying thousands of miles to Western Europe to breed. They return to reuse their old nests, year after year.

Bare hawthorn tree casts long shadow under a blue sky in early spring. Short green grass on thin soil, with flat-topped Cuilcagh Mountain in background. Rich colours of lush limestone landscape. Birds chase through the air. Tilt-up to lockdown shot with lens flare.

Cuilcagh (from Irish Binn Chuilceach) is a flat-topped mountain of sandstone and shale on the border between Co. Fermanagh and Co. Cavan. Surrounded by extensive upland blanket bog, Cuilcagh reaches a height of 665 metres.

Cuilcagh Mountain dusted with snow and bare hawthorn tree growing on windswept hillside in spring. Limestone landscape with exposed rock, thin grass and moorland. Pan L-R to lockdown shot.

Cuilcagh (from Irish Binn Chuilceach) is a flat-topped mountain of sandstone and shale on the border between Co. Fermanagh and Co. Cavan. Surrounded by extensive upland blanket bog, Cuilcagh reaches a height of 665 metres.

Blackface ewe and lambs in upland farm landscape with stone wall and wire fence in foreground. Sheep shelter near birch trees on rocky hillside, white fleecy wool ruffled by stiff breeze. Lockdown shot.

Grassland for dairy, beef and sheep farming dominates the rural landscape in Ireland. Cropping of silage, some hay and occasionally barley is common in the summer months.

Acidic peaty water bubbles over rocks in narrow limestone gorge. Small river flows through deep rock channel formed by weathering and erosion of grey limestone rock. Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh. Slow motion lockdown shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years.

Little lamb gets comfortable on dry woolly back of sheep. Ewe and her lambs in rough farm pasture on spring evening. Slow motion lockdown shot.

Grassland for dairy, beef and sheep farming dominates the rural landscape in Ireland. Cropping of silage, some hay and occasionally barley is common in the summer months.

Stump of small willow tree in woodland clearing, with brown twigs scattered in pale grass. Green moss grows on stump of coppiced willow tree. Pan L-R to lockdown shot.

Ireland has the perfect climate for willow. They are very fast growing trees, preferring wet conditions.

Little lamb stands on ewe’s woolly back, then settles down. Sheep in rough farm pasture on spring evening. Lockdown shot.

Grassland for dairy, beef and sheep farming dominates the rural landscape in Ireland. Cropping of silage, some hay and occasionally barley is common in the summer months.

Soft, silvery catkins burst from thin willow branches. Violet Willow (Salix daphnoides) sways gently against a cloudless blue sky. Rack focus static shot.

The Violet Willow (Salix daphnoides) is a medium spreading tree which is often coppiced for basket-making, owing to the attractive colour of its young stems. It flourishes in a wetland environment.

Soft, silver-coloured catkins burst from willow branches in early spring. Violet Willow sways gently in the wind against a clear blue sky. Static shot.

The Violet Willow (Salix daphnoides) is a medium spreading tree which is often coppiced for basket-making, owing to the attractive colour of its young stems. It flourishes in a wetland environment.

Fallen oak branches lie among leaves at the foot of ancient oak trees. Dried oak leaves flutter across winter grass. Tilt-down shot with rack focus.

Native Irish oaks such as Quercus robur (Pedunculate or common oak) and Quercus petraea (Sessile oak) can live for over 300 years, and support a huge variety of plants and animals.

New lambs skip across early spring pasture. Wire fence surrounds green field, with tall hedges and woodland in background. Rabbits graze on short grass. Pan R-L shot.

Grassland for dairy, beef and sheep farming dominates the County Fermanagh landscape. Cropping of silage, some hay and occasionally barley is common in the summer months.

Long, bare oak branches sway in the wind with overcast sky in background. Dried oak leaves dance across short winter grass. Static shot.

Native Irish oaks such as Quercus robur (Pedunculate or common oak) and Quercus petraea (Sessile oak) can live for over 300 years, and support a huge variety of plants and animals.

Ancient oak tree in late winter. Moss-covered tree trunk, framed by leafless oak branches and twigs. Bleached brown oak leaves litter the grass. Tilt-up rack focus shot.

Native Irish oaks such as Quercus robur (Pedunculate or common oak) and Quercus petraea (Sessile oak) can live for over 300 years, and support a huge variety of plants and animals.

Curving trunk of ancient oak tree, supporting moss and green ferns. Deeply fissured bark in foreground, tangle of bare branches in background. Tilt-up shot.

Native Irish oaks such as Quercus robur (Pedunculate or common oak) and Quercus petraea (Sessile oak) can live for over 300 years, and support a huge variety of plants and animals.

Fir trees sparkle with water droplets. Stack of sawn softwood logs with stripped bark, coated in melting wet snow. Pan L-R shot.

Ireland’s maritime climate means that spruce, fir, larch and pine trees are best suited for commercial forestry. Reaching maturity in less than 30 years, such species provide a steady supply of wood for industrial use.

Cut spruce tree lies in crisp white snow. Frayed edges of sawn timber, with tree rings in close-up view. Tilt-up shot.

Ireland’s maritime climate means that spruce, fir, larch and pine trees are best suited for commercial forestry. Reaching maturity in less than 30 years, such species provide a steady supply of wood for industrial use.

Meltwater drips slowly off splintered wood of stripped tree trunk, with water droplets caught by the wind. Rich orange-coloured timber beneath bark of muddy logs. Static shot.

Ireland’s maritime climate means that spruce, fir, larch and pine trees are best suited for commercial forestry. Reaching maturity in less than 30 years, such species provide a steady supply of wood for industrial use.

Snowflakes drift on the wind to land on pile of harvested tree trunks. Tilt-up to static shot.

Ireland’s maritime climate means that spruce, fir, larch and pine trees are best suited for commercial forestry. Reaching maturity in less than 30 years, such species provide a steady supply of wood for industrial use.

Light snow fall on pile of sawn logs. Snowflakes, tossed by the wind, drift to the ground. Static shot.

Ireland’s maritime climate means that spruce, fir, larch and pine trees are best suited for commercial forestry. Reaching maturity in less than 30 years, such species provide a steady supply of wood for industrial use.

Snow lies heaped on outer bark of felled tree. Snow-covered branches of fir trees in background wave in the wind. Static rack focus shot.

Ireland’s maritime climate means that spruce, fir, larch and pine trees are best suited for commercial forestry. Reaching maturity in less than 30 years, such species provide a steady supply of wood for industrial use.

Mist hangs over Lower Lough Erne islands in early morning. Muted colours in weak sunlight, with trees reflected in rippled water. Wood pigeon flies rapidly through scene L-R. Static shot.

Lough Erne has been a popular boating destination with Europeans for over 40 years, the leisure cruising sector contributing significantly to the local economy.

Leisure cruiser moored at a quiet jetty in early morning mist. Reed-fringed White Island in Lower Lough Erne is an important archaeological site. Pan R-L to static shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Muted colours in early morning at Aghinver. Mist hangs above thickly wooded White Island. Trees dip into the lough as light wind ripples the water surface. Leaves and branches frame the scene. Pan L-R to static shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Mist hovers over wood-fringed Lough Erne. Muted colours of early morning in Fermanagh. Birds fly over the water. Tracking L-R shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Cherry tree in spring and white flower petals dance in a gentle wind, with blue sky in background. Fresh new flowers and green leaves. Closeup handheld shot.

Wild cherry (Prunus avium) is native throughout the UK and Europe, except in the far north. Cherry trees are hermaphrodite, with their seeds being dispersed by birds which eat the dark red fruit.

Rack focus to green leaves of cherry tree, with blossom de-focussed in background. Leaves, flowers and branches wave in a light breeze. Rack focus static shot.

Wild cherry (Prunus avium) is native throughout the UK and Europe, except in the far north. Cherry trees are hermaphrodite, with their seeds being dispersed by birds which eat the dark red fruit.

Cherry buds and white blossom quiver in a light breeze. Static shot.

Wild cherry (Prunus avium) is native throughout the UK and Europe, except in the far north. Cherry trees are hermaphrodite, with their seeds being dispersed by birds which eat the dark red fruit.

Ancient corrie in the Derryveagh Mountains near Dunlewy, gouged by ice and now blanketed by peatland. Deep fissures in the bare quartzite rock and mountains worn smooth by erosion. Cliff face sits in dark shadow. Tilt up to static shot.

Errigal and Slieve Snaght dominate the Derryveagh landscape, an area of dramatic volcanic geology now softened into gentle contours with thousands of years of erosion and weathering.

Wild Cherry blossoms herald the arrival of spring. Clusters of pink buds and white flowers quiver in the breeze. Pan R-L to static shot.

Wild cherry (Prunus avium) is native throughout the UK and Europe, except in the far north. Cherry trees are hermaphrodite, with their seeds being dispersed by birds which eat the dark red fruit.

Long North Antrim coastline lashed by a winter storm. Spray fills the air as Atlantic waves crash relentlessly onto the steep sea cliffs. Static shot.

The North Antrim coast is an upland coastline of complex geology, exposed to the full force of Atlantic storms. It is a popular tourist destination throughout the year, whatever the weather.

Fresh green leaves burst out from willow branches in spring. Violet Willow (Salix daphnoides) sways gently in the wind. Shallow depth-of-field and bokeh. Static shot.

The Violet Willow (Salix daphnoides) is a medium spreading tree which is often coppiced for basket-making, owing to the attractive colour of its young stems. It flourishes in a wetland environment.

Delicate pinkish petals of Wild Cherry tree flutter gently in a spring breeze. Lichen covered branches in a tangle before a blue sky. Fresh new blossoms in foreground. Pan R-L to static shot.

Wild cherry (Prunus avium) is native throughout the UK and Europe, except in the far north. Cherry trees are hermaphrodite, with their seeds being dispersed by birds which eat the dark red fruit.

Bright green buds on Violet Willow waving in a gentle breeze. Shallow depth-of-field and bokeh. Rack focus shot.

The Violet Willow (Salix daphnoides) is a medium spreading tree which is often coppiced for basket-making, owing to the attractive colour of its young stems. It flourishes in a wetland environment.

Bright upland of the Antrim basalt plateau gives way to sheer cliffs where wild Atlantic waves batter the coast and wind carries salty mist and spray high in the air. Slow pan R-L slow motion shot.

The north coast of Antrim is an upland coast of complex geology, exposed to the full force of ocean storms. It is a popular tourist destination.

Heavy seas off the North Antrim Coast, as surf drives towards offshore igneous rock formation. Spindrift lifts off wave tops. Slow motion static shot.The north coast of Antrim is an upland coast of complex geology, exposed to the full force of Atlantic storms.

Streetlamps at Ballintoy Harbour vibrate in strong gale, as surf batters offshore rock formations. Concrete jetty coated in sea foam. Slow motion static shot.

Ballintoy, on the Causeway Coast in Northern Ireland, is a filming location for the television series ‘Game of Thrones’. It’s located in an area with a complex geological history.

Seaweed pieces hang from rusting 19th century cast iron winch. Wave splashes over sea wall in stormy weather. Spindrift lifts off the top of waves. Whitepark Bay dune formations visible in background. Static shot.

Oliver’s was an ironmongers and ship’s chandlers based in Wapping in east London, in business for much of the 19th Century, patenting and supplying maritime equipment.

Wave overtops Portbradden Harbour sea wall in a surge of brilliant white surf. Seawater streams down the lee side. Slow motion static shot.

Portbradden Harbour is located on the western edge of White Park Bay in County Antrim. Whitepark Bay is a filming location for the HBO television series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Rusting cast iron winch draped with seaweed mounted on sea wall at Portbradden. Storm-driven waves overtop harbour wall at high tide. Beach and dune formations visible in background. Slow motion static shot.

Oliver’s was an ironmongers and ship’s chandlers based in Wapping in east London, in business for much of the 19th Century, patenting and supplying maritime equipment.

Surf overtops the sea wall of Portbraddan Harbour. Long wave rolls past into White Park Bay, driven by gale-force winds. Crosswind lifts spray from the wave apex. Slow motion static shot.

White Park Bay is situated on the North Antrim Coast. On it’s western edge is Portbradden Harbour. Whitepark Bay is a filming location for the HBO television series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Waves pile into White Park Bay, driven by a winter storm. Grey-green seas with white-topped waves wash over Portbradden harbour wall. Static shot.

White Park Bay is situated on the North Antrim Coast. On it’s western edge is Portbradden Harbour. Whitepark Bay is a filming location for the HBO television series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Crumbling walls of Dunluce Castle in winter evening light with stormy sea below. Dramatic foaming waves roll past a steep cliff into the bay. Tilt-up to static shot.

Dunluce Castle (from the Irish Dún Libhse) is a ruined medieval castle, built on a dramatic clifftop location. It can be found near to the seaside town of Portrush, on the North Antrim Coast in Northern Ireland.

Low-pressure weather system at Dunseverick. ‘Weather bomb’ whips sunlit grey-green sea into bubbling white foam. Slow motion static shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with locations such as The Giant’s Causeway, Bushmills Distillery and Royal Portrush Golf Club attracting visitors year-round.

Huge seas at Dunseverick as ‘weather bomb’ gale-force winds drive waves onto the rocks in bright sunlight. Slow motion static shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with locations such as The Giant’s Causeway, Bushmills Distillery and Royal Portrush Golf Club attracting visitors year-round.

Solo cyclist leaving the pretty village of Redhills in late summer. Tree-lined undulating route with high stone wall. Static shot.

Redhills was the filming location for the film ‘The Playboys’, written by Shane Connaughton, a native of the village.

Cyclists leaving the pretty village of Redhills in summer sunshine. White car approaches from opposite direction. Tree-lined undulating route with high stone wall. Static shot.

Redhills was the filming location for the film ‘The Playboys’, written by Shane Connaughton, a native of the village.

A wintry sea at Dunseverick and foaming waves land on the shoreline. Foreground rocks are in focus, with a grey-green sea reaching to the horizon. Slow motion static shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with locations such as The Giant’s Causeway, Bushmills Distillery and Royal Portrush Golf Club attracting visitors year-round.

A December storm and grey-green waves break in a complex pattern, churning the sea into a mass of foam. A single seagull flies slowly R-L through the frame. Slow motion static shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with locations such as The Giant’s Causeway, Bushmills Distillery and Royal Portrush Golf Club attracting visitors year-round.

At Dunseverick, waves of cold foaming seawater surge over jagged black rocks. December storm flings shredded seaweed pieces on to the shore. Static shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the such notable natural features as The Giant’s Causeway, Whitepark Bay and Rathlin Island.

Spray and mist hang in the cold air as foaming seawater overtops jagged black rocks at Dunseverick. Winter storm throws shredded pieces of seaweed on to the shore. Slow motion static shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the such notable natural features as The Giant’s Causeway, Whitepark Bay and Rathlin Island.

Winter storm batters the upland coast around Whitepark Bay. Cliffs and rocky islands are pounded by huge foaming waves, with ocean spray flung high into the air. Lonely white church at Ballintoy stands prominently on the skyline. Slow motion static shot.

White Park Bay is situated on the North Antrim Coast. Around the coast from it’s eastern headland is Ballintoy Harbour. Whitepark Bay is a filming location for the HBO television series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Foaming waves surge up a narrow channel between black rocks on a rising tide. Water is drawn seaward then returns with the next wave. Static shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the such notable natural features as The Giant’s Causeway, Whitepark Bay and Rathlin Island.

Foaming sea engulfs deeply fissured black rocks at Dunseverick with green waves. Static slow motion shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the towns of Ballycastle, Bushmills, Portrush and Portstewart attracting many visitors, particularly in summertime.

Grey-green waves rush into a cove at Dunseverick. Storm-cast kelp is stacked neatly at the high-water mark. Pan R-L shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the towns of Ballycastle, Bushmills, Portrush and Portstewart attracting many visitors, particularly in summertime.

Gloomy December day with blustery gales driving waves onto black rocks. Cold, foaming green-white seas crash ashore to fill the frame. Slow motion static shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the towns of Ballycastle, Bushmills, Portrush and Portstewart attracting many visitors, particularly in summertime.

Green sea, grey sky and white waves crashing onto black rocks. A December storm drives waves onto the rocky Antrim coast. Slow motion static shot.

The North Antrim coast is a popular tourist destination, with the towns of Ballycastle, Bushmills, Portrush and Portstewart attracting many visitors, particularly in summertime.

Waves surge in to Ballintoy Harbour on a blustery day. Seawater washes the steps of the small stone boathouse. Rathlin Island is visible in the background. Static shot.

Ballintoy, on the Causeway Coast in Northern Ireland, is a filming location for the television series ‘Game of Thrones’. It’s located in an area with a complex geological history.

Sea foam fills the frame as wind gusts across Ballintoy Harbour. Small stone-built boathouse almost obscured from view on a gloomy winter day.

Ballintoy, on the Causeway Coast in Northern Ireland, is a filming location for the television series ‘Game of Thrones’. It’s located in an area with a complex geological history.

View to houses below a hillside meadow. Seed heads in muted late-summer colours are stirred by the wind. Rack focus static shot.

Fermanagh (from Irish Fir Manach or Fear Manach, meaning ‘Men of Manach’) is distinctive for being bisected by two lakes—Upper and Lower Lough Erne—which run the entire length of the county.

Waves overtop the harbour wall at high tide in stormy weather. Seawater sweeps across the concrete jetty, littered with large rocks from an earlier storm. Static shot.

Ballintoy, on the Causeway Coast in Northern Ireland, is a filming location for the television series ‘Game of Thrones’. It’s located in an area with a complex geological history.

Choppy grey waves wash along harbour wall at high tide. Waves crash around coastal rocks, throwing white spray into the air. Streetlamps shake in the strong wind. Static shot.

Ballintoy, on the Causeway Coast in Northern Ireland, is a filming location for the television series ‘Game of Thrones’. It’s located in an area with a complex geological history.

Heavy seas surge into the harbour at daybreak. Waves crash onto sea defence walls built of hard white chalk. Rathlin Island visible in the distance. Slow motion static shot.

Ballintoy, on the Antrim Coast in Northern Ireland, is a filming location for the television series ‘Game of Thrones’. This is an area with a complex geological history.

Heavy seas cascade into the tiny harbour at Ballintoy. A cloud of spume billows horizontally over the jetty wall. Slow motion static shot.

Ballintoy, on the Antrim Coast in Northern Ireland, is a filming location for the television series ‘Game of Thrones’. This is an area with a complex geological history.

Storm waves crash through narrow gap in in offshore rocks, scattering shredded seaweed. Slow motion static shot.

The north coast of Antrim is an upland coast of complex geology, exposed to the full force of Atlantic storms.

Dark waters of a slow-flowing Fermanagh river, fringed by trees. Brief glimpse of raptor hunting the riverbank in the evening sunlight. Tilt-up rack focus shot.

Fermanagh (from Irish Fir Manach or Fear Manach, meaning ‘Men of Manach’) is distinctive for being bisected by two lakes—Upper and Lower Lough Erne—which run the entire length of the county.

Farmland on the Antrim plateau, with sheer drop to the Atlantic ocean below. A rocky coastline of bays, coves and steep cliffs. Spiky gorse with brambles in bright midsummer sunlight. Tilt-down shot.

The north coast of Antrim is an upland coast of complex geology, exposed to the full force of Atlantic storms.

Quiet bay on the North Antrim coast. Seabirds wheel and dive above a glittering blue Atlantic ocean. Grass and brambles frame the scene. Static shot.

The North Antrim coastline is geologically very similar to the western isles of Scotland, which are only 20 miles distant.

Fishing boat approaches Carnlough harbour entrance. Stone causeway with navigation marker in foreground, Straidkilly headland in backround. Static shot.

Carnlough village (from Irish Carnlach, meaning ‘place of cairns’) sits on the edge of the Irish Sea in County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

Waves wash around offshore islets on the North Antrim coast. Grass and ferns frame the foreground. Seabirds circle above the ocean on rising air. Tracking R-L shot.

Looking eastward along the Antrim coast. In clear weather Scotland is visible across the sea, some 20 miles away.

Autumnal Fermanagh landscape with muted colours. Grassy drumlins and wooded vales offer a serene pastoral scene at dusk. Sun sets behind Cuilcagh Mountain. Pan R-L shot.

Fermanagh (from Irish Fir Manach or Fear Manach, meaning ‘Men of Manach’) is distinctive for being bisected by two lakes—Upper and Lower Lough Erne—which run the entire length of the county.

Quiet country road, seldom travelled. Roadway lined either side by dense hedgerow of hawthorn, ash, hazel and willow. Tilt-up to static shot.

Fermanagh (from Irish Fir Manach or Fear Manach, meaning ‘Men of Manach’) is distinctive for being bisected by two lakes—Upper and Lower Lough Erne—which run the entire length of the county.

Hedgerow-lined country lane, with view across a lush pastoral landscape to Lough Erne. Small woodland birds flit through the foreground. Cuilcagh Mountain in background. Tilt-up shot to static with lens flare.

Fermanagh (from Irish Fir Manach or Fear Manach, meaning ‘Men of Manach’) is distinctive for being bisected by two lakes—Upper and Lower Lough Erne—which run the entire length of the county.

Drumlin landscape of woodlands and fields on a warm autumn evening. Midges fill the air and fine cobwebs catch the evening light. Pan L-R shot to static with lens flare.

Fermanagh (from Irish Fir Manach or Fear Manach, meaning ‘Men of Manach’) is distinctive for being bisected by two lakes—Upper and Lower Lough Erne—which run the entire length of the county.

Faded inscriptions on headstones in a quiet country churchyard. Headstones covered in moss and lichen, now sit in the earth at crooked angles. Pastoral scene in the background. Tilt-down shot.

This location has been used as a burial ground for over a thousand years. The name Pubble probably derives from ‘people’, as it is held that St Patrick once preached to a multitude of people here.

Headstones in Pubble churchyard sit at crooked angles, framed by yew trees. Landscape of green pasture and wooded hills in the background. Tilt-down shot.

This location has been used as a burial ground for over a thousand years. The name Pubble probably derives from ‘people’, as it is held that St Patrick once preached to a multitude of people here.

Stone cottage overlooking the sea, lies in ruins. Once a thatched farmhouse, the building now crumbles away. It is surrounded by a mown hay meadow. Tilt-down shot.

Donegal (Dhún na nGall in Irish) is a county in the north-west of Ireland and is part of the province of Ulster. During the Great Famine of the late 1840s much of the county became permanently depopulated.

Successive waves of seawater soak into the sand. Static shot.

Donegal (Dhún na nGall in Irish) is a county in the north-west of Ireland and is part of the province of Ulster.

Crumbling Napoleonic coastal watchtower stands on remote grassy hilltop with grey mountains in the far distance. Pan L-R shot.

A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on a clifftop above Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal.

Wrecked wooden boat lies in the shallow waters of a sandy bay. Battered hull viewed through waving marram grass. Beach and sand dunes visible in the distance. Tilt-up shot.

‘Bád Eddie’ (Eddie’s Boat) or Cara Na Mara (‘Friend of the Sea’) was a wooden ship which ran ashore in rough seas in the early 1970s. A popular landmark, the shipwreck – located at Magherclogher beach – is slowly disintegrating.

Seagulls ride the air as storm waves crash onto the coast at Malin Beg. Spray and mist hang above the jagged rocks. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Rocky offshore islets are washed by the seas off the Antrim Coast. Seabirds wheel overhead and stems of waving grass are unfocussed in the foreground. Slow motion static shot.

Across the sea from County Antrim, Scotland is visible on a clear day, some 20 miles away.

Seabirds circle a sheltered cove and land on the steep rockface of dark columnar basalt. Surf fringes the rocks which sit in an azure blue sea. Slow-motion tilt-up shot.

Across the sea from County Antrim, on a clear day the Scottish Isles are visible, some 20 miles away.

Columnar basalt cliffs beside a blue sea. Seabirds wheel and dive into the surf. Slow motion static long shot with atmospheric interference.

Looking east along the Antrim coastline. On a clear day the Scottish Isles are visible across the sea, some 20 miles away.

Offshore islands strung out along a rugged coastline of steep basalt cliffs and stony beaches. Surf bounces on the glittering blue sea. Static shot.

Looking east along the Antrim coastline. On a clear day the Scottish Isles are visible across the sea, some 20 miles away.

Fierce Atlantic seas lash the coast as foaming waves crash over jagged black rocks. Spray erupts into the air along the rocky coastline. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Battered wooden hull of an old fishing boat, viewed through marram grass with sandy beach and dunes visible at far side of the bay. Rack focus shot.

‘Bád Eddie’ (Eddie’s Boat) or Cara Na Mara (‘Friend of the Sea’) was a wooden ship which ran ashore in rough seas in the early 1970s. A popular landmark, the shipwreck – located at Magherclogher beach – is slowly disintegrating.

Sunlight reaches through the canopy of beech tree branches to throw long shadows across a narrow country lane. Fields secured with wooden posts and sheep-wire fencing border the road. Tilt-down shot.

The Dark Hedges avenue of beech trees near Armoy in County Antrim is over 200 years old. It’s a popular photography and filming location, with scenes from the television series ‘Game of Thrones’ – amongst others – having been shot here.

Storm waves crash onto dark jagged rocks and batter sheer sea cliffs. Foam and surf boil along the Donegal coastline. Old Napoleonic watchtower stands on the clifftop and a rainbow hangs in the air. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Foaming waves crash in a violent storm and swamp jagged rocks. Water cascades back into the sea while spray and mist drift in the air. Static slow-motion shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Dark crag of Benmore in silhouette. Warm evening with sunlight sparkling on the blue, foam-flecked sea. Prickly gorse swaying in the breeze. Rack focus shot.

Also known as Benmore (from the Irish an Bhinn Mhór), Fair Head rises 196m above the sea and is the northerly point from which the length of Ireland is traditionally measured (to Mizen Head in the south).

Rope bridge 30m above a blue sea. Clouds scoot overhead as tourists queue to cross to Carrickarede island. Tiny white cottage nestled in hollow, sheltered from winter storms. Static shot.

It is believed that salmon fishermen first began building bridges to the island of Carrickarede (from the Irish Carraig a’ Ráid, meaning ‘rock of the casting’) over 350 years ago. Geologically, the island is an old volcanic plug, resisting erosion by the sea. Today, the site on the North Antrim coast is a popular tourist attraction.

Queue of tourists wait to cross to Carrickarede island by a 20m rope bridge. Blue sea surrounds black volcanic rocks of sharp headland and island. Fisherman’s cottage nestled in hollow, sheltered from ocean gales. Static shot.

It is believed that salmon fishermen first began building bridges to the island of Carrickarede (from the Irish Carraig a’ Ráid, meaning ‘rock of the casting’) over 350 years ago. Geologically, the island is an old volcanic plug, resisting erosion by the sea. Today, the site on the North Antrim coast is a popular tourist attraction.

Ballintoy Church stands on a clifftop before the surf-flecked Atlantic Ocean with Rathlin Island visible in the background. A stone wall encircles the graveyard headstones, with green fields surrounding the site. Tilt-up to static shot.

Ballintoy, on the Antrim Coast in Northern Ireland, is a filming location for the television series ‘Game of Thrones’. This is an area with a complex geological history.

Fingers of land reach into the ocean. Foaming waves wash the shoreline and roll up the white sandy beach. Fishermen’s cottages and houses are tucked into a wooded glen. A tiny harbour is protected from the open sea. Pan L-R to static shot.

White Park Bay is situated on the North Antrim Coast in Northern Ireland, with the former fishing village of Portbradden (variously Portbraddan/Portbraddon) situated at it’s western edge. Whitepark Bay is a filming location for the HBO television series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Hexagonal basalt columns of the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland. These unique geological rock formations jut into the Atlantic Ocean near Bushmills on the Causeway Coast in Co. Antrim. Static shot.

The Giant’s Causeway in Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland is a UNESCO World Heritage Site of 40,000 naturally occurring interlocking basalt columns.

Closeup view of grey, hexagonal basalt rocks of the Giant’s Causeway in Co. Antrim. Static shot with shallow depth of field.

The Giant’s Causeway in Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland is a UNESCO World Heritage Site of 40,000 naturally occurring interlocking basalt columns.

Walkers stroll on the beach as foaming waves run up onto the sand. The sea in shades of blue washes to foot of a sheer chalk cliff. In the distance, fishermen’s cottages and houses are clustered together, sheltered from the ravages of the ocean. Static shot.

White Park Bay is situated on the North Antrim Coast in Northern Ireland, with the former fishing village of Portbradden (variously Portbraddan/Portbraddon) situated at it’s western edge. Whitepark Bay is a filming location for the HBO television series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Waves splash at the foot of the Giant’s Causeway in Co. Antrim. Blue sea and white surf surround this unique rock formation. Sunlight lights the stones through the clouds for a moment. Static shot.

The Giant’s Causeway in Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland is a UNESCO World Heritage Site of 40,000 naturally occurring interlocking basalt columns.

Waves wash the stone steps of the Giant’s Causeway in Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland. Blue sea and white surf form a backdrop to this unique geological rock formation. Static shot.

The Giant’s Causeway in Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland is a UNESCO World Heritage Site of 40,000 naturally occurring interlocking basalt columns.

Wave slowly builds towards jagged rocks then explodes into massive wall of foam. Spray and mist spatter camera lens. Static, slow motion shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Dark hues of Lough Erne waters in early morning light. Flat water surface reflects muted green shades of rich woodland vegetation, cloudy blue sky and birds as they fly overhead. Dawn mist steals across the scene. Tilt-up shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Mist swirls across Lower Lough Erne in the muted colours of early morning light. Birds flying overhead are reflected in the mirror-like water. Distant woodland engulfed by mist. Static shot then pan L-R.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Yachts with white sails head out to sea from Lough Foyle. Lush green grassland in the foreground, with golf course on the shore of a blue bay at Greencastle. Magilligan beach and Benone beach beyond, with Binevenagh cliffs in the background. Static shot.

In 2014 Lough Foyle was the finishing point for Race 14 of the 9th Clipper Round the World Yacht Race.

Sailing clippers in the Atlantic Ocean off North Donegal coast. Blue sky and blue sea with few clouds. Brisk breeze with waves lapping on Stroove beach. Static shot.

In 2014 Lough Foyle was the finishing point for Race 14 of the 9th Clipper Round the World Yacht Race.

Flotilla of boats follow yachts as they set out to sea from Lough Foyle Estuary. Variety of large and small boats follow the racing clippers into the blue waters of the bay. Spectators stand to watch. Static shot.

In 2014 Lough Foyle was the finishing point for Race 14 of the 9th Clipper Round the World Yacht Race.

Evening on Lough Swilly with two fishing boats at anchor in the choppy blue waters. Blades of Lough Doo wind turbines spin vigorously in a strong sea breeze in the distance. A lone seabird flies into the frame. Static shot.

Lough Swilly (from the Irish Loch Súilí meaning ‘Lake of Shadows’) in County Donegal is a deep-water glacial fjord reknowned for it’s variety of wildlife and it’s numerous ship wrecks.

Birds fly out of the early morning haze above Rossclare Bay on Lower Lough Erne. A breeze ripples the water surface as a light mist drifts along the island shoreline. Static shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

A fresh summer morning at Rossclare Bay as the mist begins lifting to reveal a wooded island floating on top of the rippled water. Static shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

White Island at Aghinver, shrouded in early morning mist. Muted natural colours, with dew on leaves and cobwebs in foreground. Pan L-R shot.

Eight mysterious carved stone figures can be found on White Island, dating from a time before the building of the Romanesque-style church there, now in ruins.

The Annals of Ulster record that raiding Norsemen attacked and destroyed the monasteries of Lough Erne in AD 837.

Two mallard ducks pop up out of the water after feeding on the lake bed. Early morning mist floats in the air at Inishclare, with blue-grey sky and woods reflected in the smooth lough surface. Red and white navigation marker contrasts with natural muted colors. Static shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Female wild badger (Meles meles) with her cubs. Late evening and badger family explore long grass near woodland. Cubs scamper and play as sow keeps watch and searches for food. Static shot.

Also known as a brock (from the Gaelic broc meaning ‘grey’), badgers are largely nocturnal mammals. A male badger is a boar, a female is a sow, and a young badger is a cub.

Fog on lough surface in early summer morning. Rippled water gently laps on woodland shore. Birds fly high through scene, disappearing into the fog. Slowmotion static shot – 60 seconds duration.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Sunlight reflected on rippled water. Bird slowly tracking distant shoreline, flying L-R through scene. Shoreline trees in silhouette visible through mist. Slow-motion static shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Light mist floats across the lake surface, as two ducks land to feed. Bright sky and tree-covered hills reflected in smooth water of Lower Lough Erne. Midsummer early morning mist. Pan R-L shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Tractors in tandem collect cut silage from a small field on a steep Fermanagh hillside. Static shot with slight atmospheric interference.

Silage is a fermented, moist animal fodder given to cattle and sheep in winter. It is stored in a silage pit covered with plastic sheeting, or by wrapping large bales in plastic film. Silage is also used as a biofuel feedstock for anaerobic digesters.

Tractor with silage trailer manoeuvres on steep Fermanagh hillside in small field surrounded by tall hedgerows. Static shot with slight atmospheric interference.

Silage is a fermented, moist animal fodder given to cattle and sheep in winter. It is stored in a silage pit covered with plastic sheeting, or by wrapping large bales in plastic film. Silage is also used as a biofuel feedstock for anaerobic digesters.

Rusted wrought iron gate and stone pillars at the entrance to Derrybrusk old church. Tall green grass swaying in foreground; trees in background. Pan L-R shot.

The townland of Fyagh in Co. Fermanagh probably takes it’s name from the Ó Fiaich (meaning ‘raven’) family. In pre-Reformation times a thriving church existed in the townland of Fyagh, within the parish of Derrybrusk.

Bramble growing from slit window in wall of old church, now overgrown with grass and wildflowers. Slow tilt-down shot with rack focus.

The townland of Fyagh in Co. Fermanagh probably takes it’s name from the Ó Fiaich (meaning ‘raven’) family. In pre-Reformation times a thriving church existed in the townland of Fyagh, within the parish of Derrybrusk.

Stone ornamentation on Derrybrusk old church east window. Carved sandstone face is now badly weathered. Pan L-R shot.

The townland of Fyagh in Co. Fermanagh probably takes it’s name from the Ó Fiaich (meaning ‘raven’) family. In pre-Reformation times a thriving church existed in the townland of Fyagh, within the parish of Derrybrusk.

Crumbling stone wall of church, with slit window. Grasses and wildflowers to foreground. Slow rack focus.

The townland of Fyagh in Co. Fermanagh probably takes it’s name from the Ó Fiaich (meaning ‘raven’) family. In pre-Reformation times a thriving church existed in the townland of Fyagh, within the parish of Derrybrusk.

Ruins of 14th Century Derrybrusk Church. Chartres’ gothic architecture in simple form. Sandstone carvings now badly weathered. Tilt-up shot.

The townland of Fyagh in Co. Fermanagh probably takes it’s name from the Ó Fiaich (meaning ‘raven’) family. In pre-Reformation times a thriving church existed in the townland of Fyagh, within the parish of Derrybrusk.

Sandstone window frame now badly weathered; with view to trees beyond. Eroded stonework of medieval friary window at Derrybrusk. Pan L-R shot.

The townland of Fyagh in Co. Fermanagh probably takes it’s name from the Ó Fiaich (meaning ‘raven’) family. In pre-Reformation times a thriving church existed in the townland of Fyagh, within the parish of Derrybrusk.

Misty morning at Inishclare, with sunlight reflected off rippled water. Shoreline trees in silhouette visible through the fog. Slowmotion tilt-down shot.

The 2nd century Greek geographer and mathematician Ptolemy referred to the Iverni inhabitants of Ireland. The name ‘Iverni’ can be identified linguistically with the Érainn population group, who probably gave their name to the Erne.

Patchwork of fields divided by hedgerows. Neat rows of cut silage, left to wilt prior to collection. Dark green stripes of cut fodder contrast with bleached grass. Pan L-R shot.

Silage is a fermented, moist animal fodder given to cattle and sheep in winter. It is stored in a silage pit covered with plastic sheeting, or by wrapping large bales in plastic film. Silage is also used as a biofuel feedstock for anaerobic digesters.

Grass stems sway from view in a strong breeze, returning to focus each time. Static slow-motion shot.

William Drennan (1754-1820) is known as the first to refer in print to Ireland as “the emerald isle”, in his poem When Erin first rose. Son of Reverend Thomas Drennan, minister of Belfast’s First Presbyterian Church, William was one of the chief architects of the Society of United Irishmen.

Grass seed heads on slender stems sway gently in light breeze. Two stems bound together with strong thread of spider’s web. Light glows through leaves in background. Static shot.

William Drennan (1754-1820) is known as the first to refer in print to Ireland as “the emerald isle”, in his poem When Erin first rose. Son of Reverend Thomas Drennan, minister of Belfast’s First Presbyterian Church, William was one of the chief architects of the Society of United Irishmen.

Bowed grass stems heavy with seed. Light reflects off fine thread of spider web. Background bokeh as sunlight through trees is diffused. Slow tilt-up shot.

William Drennan (1754-1820) is known as the first to refer in print to Ireland as “the emerald isle”, in his poem When Erin first rose. Son of Reverend Thomas Drennan, minister of Belfast’s First Presbyterian Church, William was one of the chief architects of the Society of United Irishmen.

Bright blue speedwell hidden in green grass. Delicately veined petals and upright anthers with hairy stem. Bundle of 3 clips. Panning and static shots.

Veronica chamaedrys is an herbaceous perennial plant, native to Ireland

Flower head of red clover in orchard meadow, swaying in light breeze. Evening sunlight glints through grass. Pan R-L.

Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) is a native species of clover in Ireland. It is commonly used by farmers as a fodder crop and as a nitrogen fixing perennial, to improve soil fertility.

Bright blue damselflies with black lace wings swap places, watched by another damselfly. Static shot.

Damselflies (Zygoptera) are distinguishable from dragonflies in that most species hold their wings along the length of their abdomen when at rest.

Iridescent green Mint Beetle clambers along blade of grass towards bright blue damselfly. Static shot then defocus.

Damselflies (Zygoptera) are distinguishable from dragonflies in that most species hold their wings along the length of their abdomen when at rest. Mint Beetles are easily mis-identified as Tansy Beetles.

Three damselflies in long meadow grass near Lough Erne. Static shot.

Damselflies (Zygoptera) are distinguishable from dragonflies in that most species hold their wings along the length of their abdomen when at rest.

Single damselfly perched on grass reacts to second damselfly flying through shot. Static shot with rack focus.

Damselflies (Zygoptera) are distinguishable from dragonflies in that most species hold their wings along the length of their abdomen when at rest.

Vivid blue damselfly with black lace wings hangs from blade of grass, swaying gently in a light breeze. Closeup, tilt-down shot.

Damselflies (Zygoptera) are distinguishable from dragonflies in that most species hold their wings along the length of their abdomen when at rest.

Busy boating marina with boats of various sizes on a broad stretch of the Erne, surrounded by woodland and drumlins. Pan R-L shot.

The waterways of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh provide arguably the finest boating location in all of Europe.

A cruiser slowly rounds a bend on Upper Lough Erne, near Carrybridge. Blue fenders hang neatly down each side. Reeds, rushes and trees frame the scene. Static shot with tracking.

The waterways of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh provide arguably the finest boating location in all of Europe.

Grazing sheep oblivious to large pleasure cruiser navigating through their field of lush green grass. Upper Lough Erne, near Carrybridge. Static shot.

The waterways of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh provide arguably the finest boating location in all of Europe.

New leaves sprout from buds on the purple branches of a Violet Willow, in spring. Shallow depth-of-field and bokeh. Tilt-up shot.

The Violet Willow (Salix daphnoides) is a medium spreading tree which is often coppiced for basket-making, owing to the attractive colour of its young stems. It flourishes in a wetland environment.

Whimbrel stands on chalky rock on the Atlantic coast in Co. Antrim, near the Giant’s Causeway. Similar to a curlew, but smaller, it stands on one leg to preen it’s feathers. Static shot.

The Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) is a large wader, easily confused in the field with the larger curlew. Whimbrels appear each year on the North Antrim coast, enroute from South Africa to their breeding sites in the north of Scotland, Shetland and Orkney.

A lone whimbrel stands on a seaweed-covered chalk rock. Balancing on one leg, the seabird scratches it’s neck and preens it’s feathers. Static shot.

The Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) is a large wader, easily confused in the field with the larger curlew. Whimbrels appear each year on the North Antrim coast, enroute from South Africa to their breeding sites in the north of Scotland, Shetland and Orkney.

Midge (Chironomidae) swarm in slow-motion. Midges high in an alder tree among fresh spring leaves, with blue spring sky beyond. Static slowmo shot.

Alder (Alnus glutinosa) is the only native alder in Ireland, growing well in wetland areas up to a height of about 20m. Small birds can frequently be seen hunting for midges and other insects on the undersides of an alder’s large, flat leaves.

Swarm of tiny midges (chironomidae) buzz around the flat green leaves of an alder tree, against a clear blue spring sky. Tilt-up shot to static.

Alder (Alnus glutinosa) is the only native alder in Ireland, growing well in wetland areas up to a height of about 20m. Small birds can frequently be seen hunting for midges and other insects on the undersides of an alder’s large, flat leaves.

Cloud of midges (chironomidae) buzzing in the fresh green leaves of a young alder tree, against a clear blue sky, in spring. Rack-focus shot.

Alder (Alnus glutinosa) is the only native alder in Ireland, growing well in wetland areas up to a height of about 20m. Small birds can frequently be seen hunting for midges and other insects on the undersides of an alder’s large, flat leaves.

Lady’s Smock in lush green meadow, where delicate flowers catch the light of early morning. Pan R-L to lockdown shot.

Also known as Cuckoo Flower, Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis is a perennial wildflower which is native to Ireland, growing well in wetland conditions. The name pratensis is Latin for ‘meadow’.
Cuckooflower is the primary larvae foodplant of the Orange-tip butterfly.

Lady’s Smock and spiky new rushes in a spring meadow. Clear blue sky with bare trees in the background. Pull back from closeup of wildflowers. Handheld shot.

Also known as Cuckoo Flower, Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis is a perennial wildflower which is native to Ireland, growing well in wetland conditions. The name pratensis is Latin for ‘meadow’.
Cuckooflower is the primary larvae foodplant of the Orangetip butterfly.

Lady’s Smock in a green meadow with fresh new rushes and grass. Flowers gently swing in the Spring breeze. Top down tracking R-L shot.

Also known as Cuckoo Flower, Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis is a perennial wildflower which is native to Ireland, growing well in wetland conditions. The name pratensis is Latin for ‘meadow’.
Cuckooflower is the primary larvae foodplant of the Orange-Tip butterfly.

Lady’s Smock in a lush green meadow. Cobwebs glint silver in the light, and tiny midges drift through the rushes and long grass. Tracking R-L shot.

Also known as Cuckoo Flower, Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis is a perennial wildflower which is native to Ireland, growing well in wetland conditions. The name pratensis is Latin for ‘meadow’.
Cuckooflower is the primary larvae foodplant of the Orange Tip butterfly.

Flow tide laps gently on rocks at Port Moon. Sunset casts golden orange glow on blue sea and sky. Contham Head clifftop is dark against setting sun. Static shot including slow pan L-R.

Port Moon, on the North Antrim coast, is located between Dunseverick Castle in the east and Giant’s Causeway to the west. It was once an important harbour for local salmon fishermen.

Serene evening on the quiet Causeway Coast in Co. Antrim, where a solitary seabird gently circles in the orange sunset glow. The sun dips behind Contham Head as an incoming tide laps the rocky shore of Port Moon. Static shot.

Port Moon, on the North Antrim coast, is located between Dunseverick Castle in the east and Giant’s Causeway to the west. It was once an important harbour for local salmon fishermen.

Farmhouse on clifftop plateau at Contham Head. Evening sun casts glittering path across sea at Port Moon. Mooring buoy bobs gently on the incoming tide. Static shot including slow pan R-L.

Port Moon, on the North Antrim coast, is located between Dunseverick Castle in the east and Giant’s Causeway to the west. It was once an important harbour for local salmon fishermen.

Sun throws golden path across rocks and sea at Port Moon. Pastel blue and orange contrast with dark silhouette of Contham Head. Static shot including slow pan L-R and lens flare.

Port Moon, on the North Antrim coast, is located between Dunseverick Castle in the east and Giant’s Causeway to the west. It was once an important harbour for local salmon fishermen.

Orange glow as sun sets behind Contham Head. Clouds encroach and glittering sea turns dark. Time-lapse static shot.

Port Moon, on the North Antrim coast, is located between Dunseverick Castle in the east and Giant’s Causeway to the west. It was once an important harbour for local salmon fishermen.

Sun throws glittering path across the sea at Port Moon. A lone seabird flies low over the water, R-L through scene. Contham Head stands silhouetted in the background. Static shot.

Port Moon, on the North Antrim coast, is located between Dunseverick Castle in the east and Giant’s Causeway to the west. It was once an important harbour for local salmon fishermen.

Slender blackthorn branch with delicate white and yellow flowers bursting from new buds in April. Shallow focus with green field unfocussed background. Tracking L-R shot.

Blackthorn Prunus spinosa is a small deciduous tree which is native to Ireland. It’s dark blue-black fruits, which ripen in autumn, are known as a ‘sloes’.

April evening with blossoming blackthorn hedge, a cloud of midges and orange glow at sunset. Pan L-R shot with lens flare.

Blackthorn Prunus spinosa is a small deciduous tree which is native to Ireland. It’s dark blue-black fruits, which ripen in autumn, are known as a ‘sloes’.

Blackthorn tree in April, with delicate cream-white flowers bursting from woody branches. Tilt-down shot.

Blackthorn Prunus spinosa is a small deciduous tree which is native to Ireland. It’s dark blue-black fruits, which ripen in autumn, are known as a ‘sloes’.

Blackthorn tree in spring, with new creamy-white flowers on old lichen-covered branches. Tracking R-L shot.

Blackthorn Prunus spinosa is a small deciduous tree which is native to Ireland. It’s dark blue-black fruits, which ripen in autumn, are known as a ‘sloes’.

Blackthorn tree in bloom, with delicate creamy-white flowers. Springtime in Ireland with hedgerow blossom and thorns now sprouting new green leaves. Handheld shot.

Blackthorn Prunus spinosa is a small deciduous tree which is native to Ireland. It’s dark blue-black fruits, which ripen in autumn, are known as a ‘sloes’.

Delicate yellow petals and fresh green leaves of the wild primrose (Primula vulgaris), native to Ireland. Tracking L-R shot.

The word ‘primrose’ derives from medieval Latin prima rosa, meaning ‘first rose’, though it is not closely related to the rose family.

Bringing colour to a winter hedgerow, a pale-yellow primrose (Primula vulgaris) heralds the arrival of spring. Tracking L-R shot.

The word ‘primrose’ derives from medieval Latin prima rosa, meaning ‘first rose’, though it is not closely related to the rose family.

Signs of spring with common primrose (Primula vulgaris) hidden in a hedgerow bottom, pale yellow flowers tattered by April showers. Tracking L-R shot.

The word ‘primrose’ derives from medieval Latin prima rosa, meaning ‘first rose’, though it is not closely related to the rose family.

A carved stone water spout protrudes from the wall of this 14th Century friary at Killala Bay near Ballina. Slow-motion, pan R-L shot.

Rosserk Abbey is a Franciscan Friary, built about 1440 AD in the late Irish Gothic style, at Killala Bay in Co. Mayo in Connacht. It was destroyed in 1590.

Classic sailboat is overtaken by powerful modern boat. Blue yacht with large white sail followed by grey rigid inflatable boat. Stone church on wooded island in background. Slow motion static shot.

Crom Estate is located on the edge of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh. Yacht regattas were a feature of Crom as far back as the 1890s. Crom Castle was a filming location for the BBC ‘Blandings’ television series based on the books of PG Wodehouse.

Classic sailboat regatta on Upper Lough Erne at Crom. Yachts cross scene slowly in far distance, sails fully extended to catch light breath of wind. Slow motion static shot.

Crom Estate is located on the edge of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh. Yacht regattas were a feature of Crom as far back as the 1890s. Crom Castle was a filming location for the BBC ‘Blandings’ television series based on the books of PG Wodehouse.

Early morning mist glides across the Woodford River in Co. Fermanagh, near the border with Co. Cavan. Fish rise to feed on mayfly sitting on the still river surface. Static shot.

The Woodford River is the only waterway which joins the Erne with the Shannon. The first attempt to join these two river systems via the Woodford River, was made in 1780.

Clever bumblebee flies to some gladioli then clambers inside a flower. Handheld shot with shallow depth of field.

There are a variety of bumblebees native to Ireland. Most thrive on the abundance of wildflowers that bloom each spring and summer, but cultivated garden flowers are invaluable too in insuring their survival.

White bog cotton tufts against a blue sky. Static closeup shot.

Bog Cotton (Eriophorum angustifolium) is a variety of sedge grass. It is common on boggy, acidic soils throughout Ireland, flowering in May and producing white ‘cotton’ seed-heads in summer.

Shamrock and moss in a woodland glen. Mound of fresh green moss and delicate shamrock gently waving in a breeze, with trees in background. Closeup static shot.

Shamrock (from the Irish seamróg) means ‘little clover’ and refers to a trefoil plant which—tradition has it—St. Patrick used as a metaphor to describe the Christian Trinity.

Castle ruins with crumbling walls, stone stairs and window. Weeds grow inside, blown by the wind. Lockdown shot then tracking L-R.Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.

Brown peaty water cascades over a dark, bare limestone rock face onto boulders below. Slow-motion shot with slow tilt down.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Pollnagollum Waterfall is a filming location for the HBO series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Waterfall crashes onto boulders at the foot of a mossy green valley. Spray and mist is scattered across the scene. Slow pan R-L.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Pollnagollum Waterfall is a filming location for the HBO series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Cascade of water down grey limestone cliff, viewed through glistening green ferns. Tracking R-L slow motion shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Pollnagollum Waterfall is a filming location for the HBO series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Vintage Massey-Ferguson tractor pulls a two furrow plough, turning over sods in lush green grassland. Closeup view of front offside as black tyres approach; static shot.

In the early 1930s inventor Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.

Steady beat of engine as vintage red tractor ploughs green grassland; brown soil drops from black tyres. Blue plough. Focus on neatly ploughed furrows. Static shot with audio; shallow depth-of-field.

In the early 1930s inventor Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.

Vintage Massey-Ferguson tractor and plough with engine idling and puffs of smoke from exhaust pipe. Brown clay of overturned soil with green grass waving in the wind and woodland beyond. Summer afternoon light. Static shot.

In the early 1930s inventor Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.

Vintage red Massey-Ferguson pulls a blue two-furrow plough in late summer, gently turning over sods in lush green grassland. Brown clay spills from tyre treads. Static shot from rear.

In the early 1930s inventor Harry Ferguson from Dromore, Co. Down created the three point linkage system, the defining component which led to the development of the modern agricultural tractor.

Lichen-covered carved stonework of entrance to a ruined castle. View through doorway into narrow hallway with sunlit patch on bare stone wall. Tracking L-R shot.

Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.

Shell of castle with no roof and crumbling walls. Empty windows and fireplace remain. Stonework in light and shade contrasts. Rack focus static shot.

Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.

Stonework of castle doorway with ruined bawn wall in background and woodland beyond. Dressed and carved stone covered in lichen. Rack focus static shot.

Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.

Castle sits on hilltop above grassy valley with forest beyond. Ashlar stonework of imposing castle walls. Tracking L-R shot.

Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.

Wheat gently waving in a landscape of rolling hills, fields and hedgerows. Slow-motion static shot with shallow depth-of-field.

Cereal crops are now rare in Fermanagh. Barley is occasionally grown on suitable farmland, but the growing of wheat is unusual. In this part of Ulster such crops are grown for animal fodder, not human consumption.

Impressive wall and turret of castle in ruins. Sandstone quoins with glittering quartz. Small black musket loop visible in turret. Tracking L-R shot.

Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.

Three layered landscape with waving wheat, drumlin hill and cloudy sky. Static shot.

Cereal crops are now rare in Fermanagh. Barley is occasionally grown on suitable farmland, but the growing of wheat is unusual. In this part of Ulster such crops are grown for animal fodder, not human consumption.

Sparkling bokeh as sunlight glints on water surface, wave after wave lapping the shore. Static shot.

Lough Erne in County Fermanagh is comprised of an upper and lower lough, dotted with several hundred islands. It is a popular boating and angling destination, attracting visitors from across the world.

With a flow tide the sea gradually encroachs up the beach. Focus on high water mark. Static shot.

White Park Bay is situated on the North Antrim Coast in Northern Ireland, with the former fishing village of Portbradden (variously Portbraddan/Portbraddon) situated at it’s western edge. Whitepark Bay is a filming location for the HBO television series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Cabbage white butterfly hides behind Purple Loosestrife wildflower. Curled proboscis and striped antennae.Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is a perennial herbaceous plant native throughout the temperate Northern Hemisphere. Pieris brassicae, the Cabbage White butterfly, is often found in gardens. These butterflies are useful pollinators, but their green-coloured caterpillars are very destructive of plants.

Waves tear at cliffs in a violent winter storm. Seawater cascades off the rocks. Seagulls and spume drift through the air. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Foaming sea swirls and boils on a rocky shore during a winter gale. Spray flies as waves crash onto cliffs. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Winter storm. Choppy blue sea as white wave rises vertically over rocky cliff. Spray rains down on rockpool. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Foaming waves crash in a violent storm and swamp jagged rocks. Water cascades back into the sea while spray and mist drift in the air. Static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Churning sea swirls and boils like dry ice. Grey clouds with green and blue water contrast with bright white foam. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Wave slowly builds towards jagged rocks then explodes into massive wall of foam. Spray and mist spatter camera lens. Static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Seagulls ride the air as storm waves crash on a rocky shore. Spray and mist hang above the jagged cliffs. Static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Weak sun breaks through on a storm-battered coastline. Grey clouds and water contrast with bright white foam. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Ruined remains of 14th Century friary beside Killala Bay near Ballina. Thick stone walls and tall tower remain. Pan L-R shot.

Rosserk Abbey is a Franciscan Friary, built about 1440 AD in the late Irish Gothic style, at Killala Bay in Co. Mayo. It was destroyed in 1590.

Stone columns with gothic arch and carved angels. Circular windows set in thick stone walls of ancient friary ruins. Tilt-up shot.

Rosserk Abbey is a Franciscan Friary, built about 1440 AD in the late Irish Gothic style, at Killala Bay in Co. Mayo. It was destroyed in 1590.

Ruined friary with simple gothic doorway and black wrought-iron gate. Headstone in middle of nave. Static rack-focus shot.

Rosserk Abbey is a Franciscan Friary, built about 1440 AD in the late Irish Gothic style, at Killala Bay in Co. Mayo. It was destroyed in 1590.

Salty mist fills the air as waves break on upland coast. Sun shining on wet rocks, battered by stormy sea. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Cygnets feed upside-down on the lake bottom. Black webbed feet splash on the surface and water beads glisten on their feathers. Tracking shot.

Lakes in Ireland support a wide variety of waterfowl such as swans, ducks and geese (to which swans are closely related).

Alert wild hare stops to sniff the air for any sign of danger. Lepus timidus hibernicus with long whiskers and brown eyes sits some short grass. White ears tipped with black fur. Static shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Dried reeds conceal cygnets feeding upside-down in the lake. Sunlight reflects on the rippled surface. Tracking shot.

Lakes in Ireland support a wide variety of waterfowl such as swans, ducks and geese (to which swans are closely related).

Adult Mute Swan in closeup. Bright orange and black bill. Floating serenely on lake surface close to rocky shore. Pan R-L shot.

Lakes in Ireland support a wide variety of waterfowl such as swans, ducks and geese (to which swans are closely related).

Cygnets floating on a winter lake. Closeup view of young Mute Swans, feathers glistening with water droplets. Nostril holes in black beaks visible. Tracking shot.

Lakes in Ireland support a wide variety of waterfowl such as swans, ducks and geese (to which swans are closely related).

Family of Mute Swans paddle slowly up a lake shore in winter, searching for food. Tracking shot.

Lakes in Ireland support a wide variety of waterfowl such as swans, ducks and geese (to which swans are closely related).

Cabbage White butterflies fluttering round a Purple Loosestrife wildflower. Dark veins on white wings. Tracking R-L shot.

Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is a perennial herbaceous plant native throughout the temperate Northern Hemisphere.
Pieris brassicae, the Cabbage White butterfly, is often found in gardens. These butterflies are useful pollinators, but their green-coloured caterpillars are very destructive of plants.

Angel carved in stone, with feather details on wings; arrows shoot from hands clasped in prayer. 15th Century stone carving. Slow tilt-up shot.

Rosserk Abbey is a Franciscan Friary, built about 1440 AD in the late Irish Gothic style, at Killala Bay in Co. Mayo. It was destroyed in 1590.

Wild Irish Hare licks it’s fur clean. Lepus timidus hibernicus with long whiskers and brown eyes sits in short grass. White ears tipped with black fur. Static shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Irish Hare grooming it’s fur, then shakes it’s wet paws before sitting on them. Two hares side-by-side in a field of grass. Slow motion, static shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Wild Irish Hare munching grass. White whiskers, brown eyes and soft brown fur. Long ears tipped with black fur. Static shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Wild Irish Hare grooming it’s fur. Second hare hops into shot. Hares have long white whiskers and brown eyes and long ears tipped with black fur. Static shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Wild Irish Hare has a thorough wash to clean it’s fur. Shakes from head to tail. Long whiskers and bright, brown eyes and white ears tipped with black. Static shot.

Irish Hares (Lepus timidus hibernicus) are a subspecies of the Mountain Hare and are found only in Ireland.

Narrow stone stairs with bare walls; from bright daylight to dark, forbidding interior with cobwebs and debris. Tilt-down shot.

Rosserk Abbey is a Franciscan Friary, built about 1440 AD in the late Irish Gothic style, at Killala Bay in Co. Mayo. It was destroyed in 1590.

Napoleonic watchtower sits on clifftop above violent sea. Seagulls glide serenely over bright white foam. Slow motion static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Grey sky, green sea and white foam. Stormy sea crashes onto rocky coast in bright sunshine. Static shot.

Malin Beg (from the Irish Málainn Bhig) is an upland coastal area, close to Glencolumbkille (Gleann Cholm Cille) in County Donegal. A watchtower dating from Napoleonic times is located on the clifftop.

Interlocking spurs of the Glendun River valley in high summer, with Common Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) in the foreground and bags of cut turf, stacked and ready for collection, on the hilltop. Pan L-R.

Glendun (from the Irish Gleann Doinne) is the valley of the Dun River, one of the nine glens of the ‘Glens of Antrim’, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty found on the Antrim plateau in the north-east of Northern Ireland.

A field of unripe wheat in County Fermanagh with Devenish Island Round Tower visible in the background. Swallow flies through shot. Static shot with noticeable atmospheric interference.

Cereal crops are now rare in this part of Ulster. Barley is occasionally grown on suitable farmland, but the growing of wheat is unusual. In Fermanagh such crops are grown for animal fodder, not human consumption.

Killynick Marina on the Woodford River in Fermanagh at daybreak. Mist floats above the river. Woodland reflected in the still surface which is littered with mayfly. Fish rise to feed. Static shot.

The Woodford River is the only waterway which joins the Erne with the Shannon. The first attempt to join these two river systems via the Woodford River, was made in 1780.

Early morning mist glides across the Woodford River in Co. Fermanagh. Mayfly land on the still water surface and fish rise to feed. Static shot.

The Woodford River is the only waterway which joins the Erne with the Shannon. The first attempt to join these two river systems via the Woodford River, was made in 1780.

Forest, field and fence reflected in the Woodford River near Upper Lough Erne. Mayfly land on the flat water surface and fish rise to feed on them. Static shot.

The Woodford River is the only waterway which joins the Erne with the Shannon. The first attempt to join these two river systems via the Woodford River, was made in 1780.

Mirror river breaks on Corraquill Weir and dissolves into froth and foam. Water-lilies on river surface, concrete weir fringed with lush riverside vegetation; woodland in background. Static slow-motion shot.

The Shannon-Erne Waterway was officially re-opened in May 1994, making it possible for boats and cruisers to once again navigate from the River Erne into the River Shannon.

Brown peaty water cascades over a dark, bare limestone rock face onto boulders below. Slow tilt down shot.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years. Pollnagollum Waterfall is a filming location for the HBO series ‘Game of Thrones’.

Windfarm on moorland near Big Dog Forest plateau, turbine blades rotating against blue sky with white cumulus clouds. Pan L-R.

Several upland sites in Fermanagh are locations for wind turbines. This area is also a proposed location for fracking wells. In 2014 the Big Dog area in Co. Fermanagh was designated as an ASSI (Area of Special Scientific Interest).

Patches of sunlight on Donegal at dusk. View from Lough Navar north to Blue Stack Mountains of Donegal. Slow pan L-R.

Found on the far western edge of Europe, counties Fermanagh and Donegal are popular Ulster tourist destinations welcoming visitors from all over the world.

Magho escarpment sweeps down to the banks of Lower Lough Erne. Late summer evening landscape with shades of green. Light breeze causes ripples on the lake surface. Static shot.

Lough Erne is a popular tourist destination in County Fermanagh, offering some of the finest leisure cruising, sailing and watersports opportunities in Europe.

View west across face of Cliffs of Magho with Lower Lough Erne, in evening light. Moorland heather and grasses on plateau give way to farmland and forest below. Slow pan L-R.

Lough Erne is a popular tourist destination in County Fermanagh, offering some of the finest leisure cruising, sailing and watersports opportunities in Europe.

View west across face of Cliffs of Magho with Lower Lough Erne. Moorland heather and grasses on plateau give way to farmland and forest below. Slow pan L-R with lens flare.

Lough Erne is a popular tourist destination in County Fermanagh, offering some of the finest leisure cruising, sailing and watersports opportunities in Europe.

Subterranean river through a limestone cave. Holes in the roof—indicating collapse will follow—let in shafts of sunlight. Static shot with audio.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years.

Steep limestone cliff with Cuilcagh Mountain in background. Woodland, bare rock and grassland. Smoke from fire drifting eastwards. Static shot with noticeable atmospheric interference.

Karst features form when mildly acidic water dissolves soluble bedrock, such as limestone, over thousands of years.

Looking across Lower Lough Macnean to Marble Arch Global Geopark and Cuilcagh Mountain, with farmland, woodland and limestone cliff. Static shot with faint atmospheric interference.

Lough Macnean or Lough MacNean (from the Irish Loch Mac nÉan) is a large freshwater lake in County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland. It was once a valuable source of eels, prior to dredging and drainage in the 1960s.

Round tower and ruins of monastery on Devenish Island in Co. Fermanagh. Static shot across lake to grass-covered island with historic ruins; set against light blue sky.

The monastery on Devenish Island was founded in the 6th century by Saint Molaise. Records show that it was attacked by Viking raiders in 837AD.

Round tower and ruins of monastery on Devenish Island in Co. Fermanagh. Static shot across expanse of water to island with historic ruins set against blue sky.

The monastery on Devenish Island was founded in the 6th century by Saint Molaise. Records show that it was attacked by Viking raiders in 837AD.

Shamrock and moss covering a large boulder in a limestone gorge in Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh. Dappled with sunlight and swaying in a light breeze. Closeup, track L-R.

Shamrock (from the Irish seamróg) means ‘little clover’ and refers to a trefoil plant which—tradition has it—St. Patrick used as a metaphor to describe the Christian Trinity.

Shamrock and moss covering a large boulder in a limestone gorge in Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark, Co. Fermanagh. Dappled with sunlight and swaying in a light breeze. Static closeup shot.

Shamrock (from the Irish seamróg) means ‘little clover’ and refers to a trefoil plant which—tradition has it—St. Patrick used as a metaphor to describe the Christian Trinity.

A crowd of bog cotton swaying in a strong breeze, with hills of County Antrim around Tievebulliagh as a backdrop. Slow pan R-L.

Bog Cotton (Eriophorum angustifolium) is a variety of sedge grass. It is common on boggy, acidic soils throughout Ireland, flowering in May and producing white ‘cotton’ seed-heads in summer.

Severely eroded Hiberno-Romanesque sandstone carved church doorway in County Offaly, Leinster. Static shot of doorframe columns; slow rack focus from background to foreground.

Clonfert Cathedral dates from the end of the 12th Century. It’s ornate Hiberno-Romanesque style doorway, originally carved in sandstone, is now much deteriorated. It is said that in 563 AD Saint Brendan founded a monastery on the site where the cathedral now stands, and that his remains are buried close by.

Severely eroded Hiberno-Romanesque sandstone carved church doorway in County Offaly, Leinster. Track L-R across vertical columns.

Clonfert Cathedral dates from the end of the 12th Century. It’s ornate Hiberno-Romanesque style doorway, originally carved in sandstone, is now much deteriorated. It is said that in 563 AD Saint Brendan founded a monastery on the site where the cathedral now stands, and that his remains are buried close by.

Ornate sandstone carved church doorway showing intricate carving. Tilt down from apex of frame to top of door.

Clonfert Cathedral dates from the end of the 12th Century. It’s ornate Hiberno-Romanesque style doorway, originally carved in sandstone, is now much deteriorated. It is said that in 563 AD Saint Brendan founded a monastery on the site where the cathedral now stands, and that his remains are buried close by.

Cathedral exterior in evening light. Tilt down from tower set against blue sky to reveal church in it’s location. Ornately carved sandstone doorway visible; old graveyard surrounds the building.

Clonfert Cathedral dates from the end of the 12th Century. It’s ornate Hiberno-Romanesque style doorway, originally carved in sandstone, is now much deteriorated. It is said that in 563 AD Saint Brendan founded a monastery on the site where the cathedral now stands, and that his remains are buried close by.

Lurigethan sits dramatically above the Co. Antrim village of Cushendall. Slow pan right-left to reveal promontory sweeping down to Cushendall. Hedgerow fuchsia frames shot in foreground. Landscape rises to flat-topped plateau.

The Glens of Antrim were formed by glaciers gouging large valleys through the hard black basalt which caps an underlying geology of white chalk, creating a classic dissected plateau. These valleys run down from the heart of County Antrim to the Irish Sea, between the villages of Cushendun and Glenarm.

Long banks of milled peat await collection at the edge of a vast expanse of bare bogland. Pan across bog to reveal drainage ditch; contrast with green hillside in the distance.

Turf (peat) cut and dried by hand has been a traditional fuel source throughout the island for thousands of years. In 1946 commercial peat extraction was granted to Bord na Móna in the Republic of Ireland, under the terms of the Turf Development Act.

Milled peat awaiting collection, in a vast expanse of bare bogland. Crane up face of milled peat bank to reveal bare peat fringed by trees.

Turf (peat) cut and dried by hand has been a traditional fuel source throughout the island for thousands of years. In 1946 commercial peat extraction was granted to Bord na Móna in the Republic of Ireland, under the terms of the Turf Development Act.

Hundreds of cotton-tufted seeds float through the air, carried on the wind. Static shot through tree branches holding cotton-tufted seeds in foreground; others float quickly past in the background, visible against a blue sky.

Ireland has the perfect climate for willow. They are very fast growing, preferring wet conditions. Thousand of tiny seeds are dispersed by the wind on warm days in early summer.

Classic yachts moored side by side in Crom Bay on Lough Erne, moving in a moderate breeze. Static shot with reeds in foreground and woodland in background.

Crom Estate is located on the edge of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh. Yacht regattas were a feature of Crom as far back as the 1890s. Crom Castle was a filming location for the BBC ‘Blandings’ television series based on the books of PG Wodehouse.

Classic yacht near Crom Castle in Co. Fermanagh. Static shot as boat in full sail drifts right to left across scene. Church partly hidden by woodland in background.

Crom Estate is located on the edge of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh. Yacht regattas were a feature of Crom as far back as the 1890s. Crom was a filming location for the BBC series ‘Blandings, based on the books of PG Wodehouse.

Classic sailboat regatta on Upper Lough Erne at Crom. Static shot as 18 sailboats cross scene slowly in far distance. Expanse of lake extends from foreground to sailboats in background.

Crom Estate is located on the edge of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh. Yacht regattas were a feature of Crom as far back as the 1890s. Crom Castle was a filming location for the BBC ‘Blandings’ television series, based on the books of PG Wodehouse.

Cruiser approaching Crichton Tower on Gad Island. Static shot of cruiser approaching stone tower. Fast focus in to subject. Woodland in background. Cruiser tows speedboat.

Crom Estate is located on the edge of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh. Yacht regattas were a feature of Crom as far back as the 1890s. Crom Castle was a filming location for the BBC ‘Blandings’ television series, based on the books of PG Wodehouse.

Wind turbine at Big Dog Forest in County Fermanagh. Static shot of turbine blades rotating against blue sky with cumulus clouds. Lough Melvin and Aghavogil Bog Natural Heritage Area (Co. Leitrim) visible in far distance.

Several upland sites in Fermanagh are locations for wind turbines. This area is also a proposed location for fracking wells. In 2014 the Big Dog area in Co. Fermanagh was designated as an ASSI (Area of Special Scientific Interest).

Classic sailboat at anchor near Crom Castle Estate. Static shot of sailboat at anchor with church in woodland beyond. Reeds in foreground. Wind turbines in far distance. Sunlight glints on lake surface.

Crom Estate is located on the edge of Upper Lough Erne in Co. Fermanagh. Yacht regattas were a feature of Crom as far back as the 1890s. Crom Castle was a filming location for the BBC ‘Blandings’ television series, based on the books by PG Wodehouse.

Interior of embrasure (musket loop) in castle wall. View across feature with stonework in shadow and bright landscape with trees in the distance visible through narrow slit. Tracking L-R shot.

Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.

Defensive entrance to ruined castle showing murder holes. Pan across the stonework arch with towers either side, view up with blue sky beyond. Low angle pan L-R shot.

Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.

Ruined castle exterior shot in natural light. Grassland foreground with woods in far background. Tilt down from blue sky to reveal castle in it’s location. Tilt-down to lockdown shot.

Monea Castle is a ruined plantation castle in County Fermanagh which is in State care. The castle was abandoned after a fire in the early 18th century.